Jun 26, 2022  
2018 - 2019 Catalog 
    
2018 - 2019 Catalog Archives - Prior Version

Course Descriptions


 

ACC - Accounting

  
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    ACC 150 - Accounting Principles I


    This is an introductory accounting course designed to introduce underlying concepts and Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) used in determining revenue recognition, expense recognition, asset valuation, and reporting of liabilities. Double-entry accounting is introduced and applied to service companies. The entire accounting cycle for a service business operating as a sole proprietorship will be presented - from the point of original entry through the adjustment process, financial statement preparation, and post­closing trial balance preparation. Students will first be exposed to a manual accounting system, then QuickBooks Online will be utilized to expose students to computerized accounting systems. 
    3 credits
  
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    ACC 160 - Payroll Accounting


    This course introduces students to accounting for wages and salaries as well as procedures for maintaining accurate payroll records. Topics covered include calculation of wages and salaries, income taxes, Social Security taxes, unemployment taxes, personnel records, and payroll accounting systems. Students practice keeping payroll records and accounting for wages and salaries while producing relevant reports and tax forms.
    Prerequisite(s): ACC 150 Accounting Principles I
    3 credits
  
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    ACC 175 - Accounting Principles II


    This course builds on the underlying concepts and principles of accounting attained in ACC 150 Accounting Principles I. Internal control policies and procedures, bank reconciliations, and petty cash funds are explored. Merchandising companies are introduced, and accounting for and reporting of inventory assets are presented. The entire accounting cycle for a merchandising business operating as a sole proprietorship will be presented - from the point of original entry through the adjustment process, financial statement preparation, and post-closing trial balance preparation. Students will first be exposed to a manual accounting system, then QuickBooks Online will be utilized to expose students to computerized accounting systems. Accounting for uncollectable accounts receivable, short-term notes receivable, and short-term notes payable is also introduced. 
    Prerequisite(s): ACC 150 Accounting Principles I
    3 credits
  
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    ACC 201 - Intermediate Accounting


    Economic resources including cash, receivables, inventories, and long-term assets are explored in-depth along with a variety of financial instruments including current liabilities, contingencies, bonds, long-term notes, and shareholders’ equity. Statement of cash flows preparation will be emphasized along with the use of ratios to assess financial performance.
    Prerequisite(s): ACC 175 Accounting Principles II
    3 credits
  
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    ACC 220 - Automated Accounting


    This course is designed to provide a working knowledge of how computerized accounting systems function. Students work with up-to-date commercial accounting software commonly used in small to mid-sized business. Includes six fully integrated accounting modules: General Ledger, Accounts Receivable, Accounts Payable, Payroll, Inventory, and Projects.
    Prerequisite(s): ACC 110 Principles of Accounting, CIT 100 Microcomputer Applications
    3 credits
  
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    ACC 225 - Accounting Simulations


    Students work independently with instructor support to complete three accounting simulations. Accounting simulations include a variety of accounting scenarios including manual and computerized accounting systems. Students will work to complete the accounting cycle and prepare accurate financial reports for each company as though they were the staff accountant.
    Prerequisite(s): ACC 160 Payroll Accounting, ACC 175 Accounting Principles II, ACC 220 Automated Accounting
    3 credits
  
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    ACC 230 - Managerial Accounting


    This course prepares students to understand the critical role that cost management information plays in the overall success of an organization. It presents the essential concepts, behavior, and accounting techniques applicable to manufacturing cost systems.
    Prerequisite(s): ACC 150 Accounting Principles I
    3 credits
  
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    ACC 260 - Federal Taxation of Individuals


    This course provides a practical approach to preparation of federal income tax returns for individuals. Students will prepare individual tax returns and related schedules required by the Internal Revenue Code both manually and by using a software solution.
    3 credits
  
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    ACC 299 - Capstone Seminar


    This is a capstone course intended to review critical areas of bookkeeping students must master prior to testing for bookkeeping certification through the American Institute of Professional Bookkeepers (AIPB). Students will complete two parts of the certification testing in class; the other two portions will be taken at the closest Prometric test center. This course includes a field experience (i.e., internship - paid or unpaid) component whereby the student must complete a minimum of forty-five hours of accounting/bookkeeping work to place on his or her resume. 
    Prerequisite(s): ACC 225 Accounting Simulations, ACC 201 Intermediate Accounting
    4 credits

ACE - ACESS

  
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    ACE 200 - ACESS Portfolio


    This course prepares students for competing effectively in the highly competitive, real-life employment marketplace. The course focuses on career portfolio development/preparation, resume and cover letter preparation, hands-on experience in effectively using career exploratory reference materials, job search techniques, pre- and post-interviewing techniques, including a mock interview and critique, test taking tips, and appropriate professional apparel.
    Note(s): This is a higher level course and should be taken in the student’s last or second to last semester. It is highly recommended that this course be completed prior to one’s internship semester.
    1 credit

ACP - Academic Career Planning

  
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    ACP 100 - Academic and Career Planning


    This course is designed to give first semester students a solid foundation of planning and professionalism to successfully complete their education and career goals, and to help them become engaged members of the College and professional community. Students will be involved in career exploration, setting real-world goals with academic planning and resume building, learning the tools available for their academic success, and the professionalism needed to carry them forward into the academic world and the job market. 
    1 credit
  
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    ACP 105 - Promoting Academic Success


    This course is designed to empower students with disabilities to succeed at career planning and in higher education. The course will provide important information about the college experience, including strategies for success in a college setting. Students will develop skills to foster academic success and identify future goals as they prepare to lead responsible lives in a diverse, interconnected and changing world.
    1 credit

ANT - Anthropology

  
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    ANT 100 - Introduction to Cultural Anthropology**


    This is a survey course in which students will learn the terminology that describes the field of cultural anthropology.  In addition to learning the classical principles of anthropology, students will explore the structures that make up cultures and cultural dilemmas.  Students will gain an understanding of the importance of accurate research, observation, and data collection that will help anthropologists understand culture.  This course focuses on the thesis that every society is based upon an integrated culture that satisfies human needs and facilitates survival.  This course examines diverse cultures from the far reaches of the earth as well as the way that American subcultures fit into the broad range of human possibilities.  The majority of multimedia lessons in this course are multicultural in their approach; there are also several ethnographic studies of individual societies.  These studies guide the student toward deeper exploration of the layers of culture which make a given culture successful. 
    Note(s): **This course is part of the 30 credit transfer framework agreement with the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education universities.
    3 credits

ART - Art

  
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    ART 101 - Introduction to Art History**


    This course introduces the major periods of Western art history, including: Ancient, Egyptian, Greek, Early Medieval, Romanesque, Gothic, Renaissance, Baroque, 19th and 20th Century. The course will examine the religious, philosophical, and social forces that shaped the masterpieces.
    Note(s): **This course is part of the 30 credit transfer framework agreement with the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education universities.
    3 credits
  
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    ART 105 - Drawing Fundamentals


    This introductory, hands-on course introduces the student to basic drawing fundamentals associated with observational drawing. Techniques explored will include gesture, line, shape, volume, tone, contrast, texture, positive/negative space, perspective and relevant color theory. Students will learn basic drawing skills and fundamental art composition concepts using various media to develop an expression of individual artistic style.
    3 credits
  
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    ART 110 - Introduction to Painting and Sculpting**


    This hands-on course introduces the student to various materials, techniques and methods used to create works of art. The course involves 2 dimensional and 3 dimensional projects.  Through class critique, students will be encouraged to articulate and reflect on their own work and the work of classmates. Students will also develop an awareness and appreciation of painting, sculpting and mixed media within the visual arts.
    Note(s): **This course is part of the 30 credit transfer framework agreement with the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education universities.
    3 credits

ASL - American Sign Language

  
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    ASL 101 - American Sign Language I


    This course introduces American Sign Language. It focuses on conversation in signs, basic grammar, and cultural aspects of the deaf community.  Students will be able to describe and discuss everyday matters and situations in a culturally appropriate manner using their growing sign vocabulary, more complex grammatical principles and communicative strategies that assist in being understood by the deaf listener. 
    3 credits

AST - Astronomy

  
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    AST 100 - Introduction to Astronomy


    Introduction to Astronomy will explore the origin, characteristics and evolution of the solar system, the stars, the galaxies, and the universe. The course will discuss historical milestones in the science of astronomy from ancient astronomers to the space probes of today. Consideration will be given to the future of astronomical research and current theories in astronomy.
    3 credits

AVI - Aviation

  
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    AVI 110 - Private Pilot Theory


    This course provides the foundation of knowledge needed to progress to the theory courses and flight labs required for professional certificates and ratings. Commonly referred to as “ground school,” the course covers the basic components of an airplane as well as elements of aerodynamics, weather, navigation, safety, the national airspace system, and general operating rules and regulations required for the Private Pilot knowledge requirements. Successful completion of this course will provide an endorsement to take the FAA Private Pilot Knowledge Test.
    3 credits
  
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    AVI 112 - Private Pilot Lab I


    This course is designed to meet all requirements and prepare the student for solo flight. It is intended to be taken in conjunction with AVI 110 Private Pilot Theory and will provide foundational knowledge in the following components of flight in preparation for the FAA Private Pilot Certification process: preflight preparation, inspection, and servicing; airplanes and aerodynamics; airports, air traffic control, and airspace; airplane performance and weight and balance; aeromedical factors and aeronautical decision making; airplane instruments, engines, and systems; basic instrument maneuvers; aviation weather; aviation weather services; and, federal aviation regulations. Each new skill presented will be taught on the basis of previously mastered knowledge and skills; therefore, it is important that the student allow for sufficient flight time. 
    Prerequisite(s): Prior to beginning flight training, students must make application for an FAA student pilot certificate; possess at least 3rd class FAA aero-medical certification; proof of U.S. Citizenship as evidenced by birth certificate or Passport or successful TSA screening; and the ability to read, clearly speak, and write in English.
    Co-requisite(s): A VI 110 Private Pilot Theory or credit for previous ground training
    2 credits
  
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    AVI 113 - Private Pilot Lab II


    This course is designed to meet all requirements for completion of the FAA Private Pilot Certificate. It is intended to be taken after successful completion of AVI 110 Private Pilot Theory and AVI 112 Private Pilot Lab 1. This course will provide instruction in the following components of flight in preparation for the FAA Private Pilot Certification process: maximum performance takeoff and landings; solo maneuvers; navigation systems; cross-country flights; night flying and night cross-country procedures; airplane performance and weight and balance; solo cross-country flights; basic instrument maneuvers. Each new skill presented will be taught on the basis of previously mastered knowledge and skills; therefore, it is important that the student allow for sufficient flight time.
    Prerequisite(s): AVI 110 Private Pilot Theory, AVI 112 Private Pilot Lab I
    2 credits
  
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    AVI 114 - Private Pilot Practical Exam Preparation


    This course provides a comprehensive overview of knowledge required and thorough preparation for the FAA Private Pilot Practical Examination. It is designed for student pilots who are enrolled in a 14 CFR Part 141 flight school and are training for the private pilot certificate. This course will also prove beneficial to students training under 14 CFR Part 61 and private pilots who wish to refresh their knowledge or who are preparing for a flight review. The course is organized to address the seven areas of knowledge required for the practical test, including: certificates and documents; weather; determining performance and limitations; airplane systems; cross-country flight planning; night operations; and aeromedical factors.
    Prerequisite(s): AVI 110 Private Pilot Theory, AVI 112 Private Pilot Lab I, AVI 113 Private Pilot Lab II
    Co-requisite(s): May be taken as a co-requisite with AVI 113 Private Pilot Lab II
    1 credit
  
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    AVI 120 - Instrument Pilot Theory


    This course will introduce the concepts of aircraft control by scan and interpretation of flight instruments. The student will learn to recognize unusual attitude indications and recover from such situations. Human Factors, CRM, and flight physiology will be emphasized. There will be an in-depth study of pitot-static and gyroscopic instrument systems and recognition of anomalies in these systems. The theory of operation, interpretation, and use of VOR, ADF, DME, GPS, RNAV, RMI, HSI and autopilot systems will be examined. A detailed study of IFR regulations, procedures, and publications for IFR operating rules in the U.S. Airspace System will be included. Aviation meteorology will be studied in more detail as well as recognition of potentially hazardous flight conditions. Successful completion of this course will provide an endorsement to take the FAA Instrument Rating written exam.
    Prerequisite(s): AVI 110 Private Pilot Theory or credit for previous ground training
    3 credits
  
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    AVI 122 - Instrument Pilot Lab I


    This course is designed for the Private Pilot to gain the skills necessary to precisely control the plane using basic attitude instrument flying and the airplane’s navigation systems. It is intended to be taken in conjunction with AVI 120 Instrument Pilot Theory. The following components of instrument flight training will be mastered in this course: VOR and GPS holding; Localizer, DME, and intersection holds; VOR and GPS approaches; Localizer and ILS approaches; cross-country procedures; federal aviation regulations; departure, enroute and arrival procedures; loss of communications and emergency procedures. Each new skill presented will be taught on the basis of previously mastered knowledge and skills; therefore, it is important that the student allow for sufficient flight time. 
    Prerequisite(s): Private Pilot Certification, AVI 110 Private Pilot Theory, AVI 112 Private Pilot lab I, AVI 113 Private Pilot lab II, or credit given for ground and flight training.
    Co-requisite(s): AVI 120 Instrument Pilot Theory
    2 credits
  
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    AVI 123 - Instrument Pilot Lab II


    This course is designed to meet all requirements for the FAA instrument rating. It is intended to be taken as a continuation of instrument flight training in AVI 122 Instrument Pilot Lab 1. The following components of instrument flight training will be mastered in this course: VOR and GPS holding; Localizer, DME, and intersection holds; VOR and GPS approaches; Localizer and ILS approaches; cross-country procedures; federal aviation regulations; departure, enroute, and arrival procedures; loss of communications and emergency procedures. Each new skill presented will be taught on the basis of previously mastered knowledge and skills; therefore, it is important that the student allow for sufficient flight time.
    Prerequisite(s): FAA third class medical certificate, Proof of U.S. Citizenship or Transportation Security Administration Check, Private Pilot Certification, AVI 120 Instrument Pilot Theory, AVI 122 Instrument Pilot Lab I. NOTE: Students may also take AVI 123 in conjunction with AVI 120, provided AVI 122 has been successfully completed.
    Co-requisite(s): AVI 120 Instrument Pilot Theory (if not previously completed)
    2 credits
  
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    AVI 124 - Instrument Pilot FAA Practical Exam Preparation


    This course provides a comprehensive overview of knowledge required and thorough preparation for the FAA Instrument Pilot Practical Examination. It is designed for student pilots who are enrolled in a 14 CFR Part 141 flight school and are training for the instrument rating. This course will also prove beneficial to students training under 14 CFR Part 61 and instrument pilots who wish to refresh their knowledge or who are preparing for a flight review. The course is organized to address the four areas of knowledge required for the practical test, including: flight planning; departure; enroute; and arrival. 
    Prerequisite(s): AVI 120 Instrument Pilot Theory, AVI 122 Instrument Pilot Lab I, AVI 123 Instrument Pilot Lab II
    Co-requisite(s): May be taken as a co-requisite with AVI 123 Instrument Pilot Lab II
    1 credit
  
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    AVI 210 - Commercial Pilot Theory


    This course will take the concepts studied in Private Pilot Theory and Instrument Pilot Theory to a more advanced level to prepare the student for a professional career in the field. Subject matter will include Federal Aviation Regulations that pertain to Commercial Pilot privileges, limitations, and flight operations, NTSB accident case studies and accident/incident reporting, Aerodynamics, Meteorology to include recognition of critical weather situations and use of reports and forecasts, effects of exceeding aircraft performance limitations, function of complex aircraft systems and high performance aircraft operations, aviation safety to include aeronautical decision making and judgment, aviation physiology to include night and high altitude operations, review of the National Airspace System, and Human Factors in aviation. Successful completion of this course will provide an endorsement to take the FAA Commercial Pilot written exam.
    Prerequisite(s): AVI 110 Private Pilot Theory, AVI 111 Private Pilot Lab, AVI 120 Instrument Pilot Theory, and AVI 121 Instrument Pilot Flight or credit for previous ground and flight training.
    4 credits
  
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    AVI 211 - Commercial Pilot Flight I


    This course will provide the student with part of the flight training required of the Commercial Pilot FAA practical test standards. This is the first half of two phases of flight training. MTT Aviation Services at the Johnstown Cambria County Airport will provide the flight training. The student will receive pre/post briefings on the commercial maneuvers and complex aircraft systems within the FAA practical test standards before and after flight training. The instruction will include dual flight time and solo flight time for experience requirements.
    Note(s): Success in this lab course requires that students achieve the FAA competencies in 50.5 Flight Hours.
    Prerequisite(s): FAA 3rd class medical certificate, Proof of U.S. Citizenship or Transportation Security Administration Check, AVI 110 Private Pilot Theory, and Private Pilot License or credit for previous flight/ground training.
    Co-requisite(s): AVI 210 Commercial Pilot Theory
    3 credits
  
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    AVI 212 - Commercial Pilot Flight II


    This course will provide the second part of the flight training required of the Commercial Pilot FAA practical test standards. This is the second half of two phases of flight training. MTT Aviation Services at the Johnstown Cambria County Airport will provide the flight training. The student will receive pre/post briefings on the commercial maneuvers and complex systems within the FAA practical test standards before and after flight training. The instruction will include dual flight time and solo flight time for experience requirements. Successful completion of this course will provide an endorsement to take the FAA Commercial Pilot Practical Flight Test. Students must complete both the FAA Commercial Written test and FAA Commercial Practical Pilot Flight test to achieve the Commercial Pilot License.
    Note(s): Success in this lab course requires that students achieve the FAA competencies in 62.5 Flight Hours.
    Prerequisite(s): FAA 3rd class medical certificate, Proof of U.S. Citizenship or Transportation Security Administration Check, AVI 210 Commercial Pilot Theory, and AVI 211 Commercial Pilot Flight I or credit for previous flight/ground training.
    3 credits
  
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    AVI 213 - Commercial Pilot Practical Exam Preparation


    This course provides a comprehensive overview of knowledge required and thorough preparation for the FAA Commercial Pilot Practical Exam. It is designed for student pilots who are enrolled in a 14 CFR Part 141 flight school and are training for the commercial pilot certificate. This course will also prove beneficial to students training under 14 CFR Part 61 and pilots who wish to refresh their knowledge. The course is organized to address the six areas of knowledge required for the practical test, including: Airplane aerodynamics and systems; airspace; airplane performance; aviation weather; navigation and flight operations.
    Prerequisite(s): Private Pilot Certification, Instrument Pilot Certification, AVI 210 Commercial Pilot Theory, AVI 211 Commercial Pilot Flight I, AVI 212 Commercial Pilot Flight II
    Co-requisite(s): May be taken as a co-requisite with AVI 212 Commercial Pilot Flight II
    2 credits

BIO - Biology

  
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    BIO 102 - Life Science


    This non-major survey course examines the processes common to all life on Earth. Science and the scientific method are described. Lecture topics include cell structure, energy transfer in plants and animals, genetics, evolution, ecology and conservation and will be reinforced through in-class demonstrations and activities when appropriate. This course may or may not be transferrable to 4 year colleges as a science course.
    3 credits
  
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    BIO 104 - Principles of Biology I Lecture


    This introductory course provides an overview of the basic principles of biology including the structure and function of the cell, cellular respiration, photosynthesis, mitosis, meiosis, genetics and evolution. Lectures emphasize human biology and are complemented by discussions that stress critical thinking. This course is designed to prepare students for more advanced courses in biology.
    Co-requisite(s): BIO 114 Principles of Biology I Lab
    3 credits
  
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    BIO 106 - Principles of Biology II Lecture


    This introductory course provides an overview of the basic principles of biology including the structure and function of animals and plants, including organ systems, reproduction and the regulation of body systems. The course also provides an overview of the Earth’s ecosystems and the diversity of life within each ecosystem. Lectures are complemented by discussions that stress critical thinking. This course is designed to prepare students for more advanced courses in biology.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 104 Principles of Biology I
    Co-requisite(s): BIO 116 Principles of Biology II Lab
    3 credits
  
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    BIO 108 - Forensic Biology Lecture


    This course is designed to show students the link between science and criminal conviction. Through the application of the scientific method, students will investigate decomposition, body fluid, DNA, trace evidence, and significant microbial evidence. Students will apply the basic principles of biotechnology and crime scene investigation to solve a crime.
    Co-requisite(s): BIO 118 Forensic Biology Lab
    3 credits
  
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    BIO 114 - Principles of Biology I Lab


    This introductory course provides an overview of the basic principles of biology including the structure and function of the cell, cellular respiration, photosynthesis, mitosis, meiosis, genetics and evolution. Lab experiments are designed to teach basic scientific skills, and to reinforce the topics covered during BIO 104 lectures. This course is designed to prepare students for more advanced courses in biology.
    Co-requisite(s): BIO 104 Principles of Biology I Lecture
    1 credit
  
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    BIO 116 - Principles of Biology II Lab


    This introductory course provides an overview of the basic principles of biology including the structure and function of animals and plants, including organ systems, reproduction and the regulation of body systems. The course also provides an overview of the Earth’s ecosystems and the diversity of life within each ecosystem. Lab experiments are designed to teach basic scientific skills, and to reinforce the topics covered during lectures. This course is designed to prepare students for more advanced courses in biology.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 104 Principles of Biology I
    Co-requisite(s): BIO 106 Principles of Biology II Lecture
    1 credit
  
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    BIO 118 - Forensic Biology Lab


    This course is designed to enhance student understanding of the link between science and criminal investigation. Through the application of the scientific method, students will investigate decomposition, body fluid, DNA, trace evidence, and significant microbial evidence. Students will apply the basic principles of biotechnology and crime scene investigation to solve a crime.
    Co-requisite(s): BIO 108 Forensic Biology Lecture
    1 credit
  
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    BIO 202 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I


    This course introduces the student to the structure and function of the human body. This is a semester long introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology and prepares the student for Human Anatomy and Physiology II. Course topics will include the organization of the body at the molecular, cellular, and tissue levels and homeostatic mechanisms associated with the endocrine, integumentary, skeletal, muscle, and nervous systems.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 104 Principles of Biology I or accepted by CSON or high school biology within the last five years
    Co-requisite(s): BIO 212 Human Anatomy and Physiology Lab
    3 credits
  
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    BIO 204 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II


    This course is the second half of a yearlong introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology. Course topics will include the organization of the body systems at the molecular, cellular, and tissue levels and homeostatic mechanisms associated with the cardiovascular, respiratory, lymphatic, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 202 Human Anatomy and Physiology I or accepted by CSON
    Co-requisite(s): BIO 214 Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab
    3 credits
  
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    BIO 206 - Microbiology


    This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamental concepts of microbiology, and the application of those concepts to human disease. Lecture will include the study of microorganisms, their metabolic processes, and their relationship to disease.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 104 Principles of Biology I Lecture or accepted by CSON
    Co-requisite(s): BIO 216 Microbiology Lab
    3 credits
  
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    BIO 207 - Ecology


    This course will acquaint students with the fundamental principles of an ecological science, including concepts of relationships between organisms and environments, climate effects on ecological environments, ecological community structures, animal and plant population growth and analysis of species diversity according to specific ecosystems.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 104 Principles of Biology I Lecture/BIO 114 Principles of Biology I Lab, MAT 131 Intermediate Algebra
    Co-requisite(s): BIO 217 Ecology Lab
    3 credits
  
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    BIO 208 - Genetics


    Organisms can be more fully understood by knowing the hereditary make up that dictates development. This lecture course will introduce the student to heredity through the study of chromosomes, mutations, molecular genetics and evolutionary genetics. The principles presented in this course will prepare the life science major for more advanced topics in the field of biology.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 104 Principles of Biology I Lecture
    Co-requisite(s): BIO 218 Genetics Lab
    3 credits
  
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    BIO 212 - Human Anatomy and Physiology Lab I


    This course introduces the student to the structure and function of the human body. This is a semester long introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology Lab applications. Students will experience and apply the material learned in lecture through experimentation and application of the scientific method to the following topic areas. Course topics will include the organization of the body at the molecular, cellular, and tissue levels, focusing on the integumentary, skeletal, muscle, and nervous systems.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 104 Principles of Biology I; or accepted by CSON; or high school biology within the last five years
    Co-requisite(s): BIO 202 Human Anatomy and Physiology I
    1 credit
  
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    BIO 214 - Human Anatomy and Physiology Lab II


    This course is the continuation of BIO 212 Human Anatomy and Physiology I Lab. Students will experience and apply the material learned in lecture through dissection and application of the scientific method to the following topic areas: cardiovascular, muscular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, reproductive, and endocrine systems.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 202 Human Anatomy and Physiology I or accepted by CSON
    Co-requisite(s): BIO 204 Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lecture
    1 credit
  
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    BIO 216 - Microbiology Lab


    This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamental concepts of microbiology, through the application of those concepts to human disease. Laboratory work includes culturing, staining, studying, and identifying microorganisms.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 104 Principles of Biology I or accepted by CSON
    Co-requisite(s): BIO 206 Microbiology
    1 credit
  
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    BIO 217 - Ecology Lab


    The course illustrates many of the topics introduced in lecture through hands-on laboratory experiments and detailed case studies.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 104 Principles of Biology I Lecture/BIO 114 Principles of Biology I Lab, MAT 131 Intermediate Algebra
    Co-requisite(s): BIO 207 Ecology
  
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    BIO 218 - Genetics Lab


    Organisms can be more fully understood by knowing the hereditary make up that dictates development. Through laboratory experiences, students will apply genetic concepts that are introduced in lecture, such as chromosome structure, mutation, and evolutionary genetics. The principles presented in this course will prepare the life science major for more advanced topics in the field of biology.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 104 Principles of Biology I Lecture
    Co-requisite(s): BIO 208 Genetics
    1 credit

BUI - Building

  
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    BUI 105 - Architecture I


    This course covers techniques for rapid development of working plans. Students will learn to identify, create, store and use appropriate symbols within the CADD environment. The main emphasis will be placed on design and engineering for residential construction, some comparisons will be made to the similar techniques used for commercial projects. Drawings included within the course will be: sections, floor plans, foundation plans, various schedules and elevations. Advanced drafting techniques utilizing the latest CADD software will be emphasized.
    Prerequisite(s): CAD 106 Computer Aided Drafting II
    3 credits (2 lecture; 1 lab)
  
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    BUI 106 - Civil I


    This course starts with the fundamentals of raw data and how to work with it in a CADD environment to produce Civil drawings and Survey drawings. This course covers the basics for a boundary survey drawing including meets and bounds descriptions, symbols, and abbreviations. The student will also learn to create topographic drawings to include all existing information found in the field. The raw information used to create the topographic drawing will then be used to perform grading and volume calculations. A complete explanation of symbols, abbreviations, and drawing requirements will be given as they relate to the creation of civil and survey drawings.
    Prerequisite(s): CAD 106 Computer Aided Drafting II
    3 credits (2 lecture; 1 lab)
  
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    BUI 125 - Architectural Blueprint Reading


    This course covers the basics for reading blueprints for Architecture construction plans. Students will learn various layouts and structure of Architecture construction plans. They will learn and understand common symbols and drawing techniques used in the industry. Students will learn how to identify and find floor plans, details, schedules, notes and sections within any complete set of Architecture construction plans. The student will than learn to perform quantity take-offs for the materials needed to construct a given project.
    3 credits
  
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    BUI 130 - Introduction to Survey


    Study includes linear measurements with tape; differential leveling and vertical control measurements; vertical and horizontal angles with a total station. Student will learn about the different survey equipment and also how to use the survey equipment. Student will learn about closed traverses, topographic work, bench marks, and profile leveling. The student will learn how to input field data into Civil 3D software and learn how to prepare cut and fill sheets for various types of projects. This course will have the student in the classroom and out in the field working with survey equipment.
    Prerequisite(s): MAT 115 Construction Math
    2 credits (1 lecture; 1 lab)
  
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    BUI 221 - Building Component - Electrical


    This course covers and utilizes the theories and symbolic representation used in Design and Layout of Electrical Drawings. The student will learn how to design and draw basic residential electrical drawings using CAD. The student will work with the basic requirements for lighting design and layouts and apply that knowledge to the creation of lighting drawings using CAD.
    Prerequisite(s): CAD 105 Computer Aided Drafting I, CAD 106 Computer Aided Drafting II
    3 credits
  
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    BUI 222 - Building Component - Plumbing/Fire Protection


    This course covers the basic symbols, symbol libraries, abbreviations, details, and schematic diagrams used on plumbing/fire protection design drawings for buildings. The student will learn how to design and draw basic plumbing plans. The student will use industry codes governing fixture selection and layout when designing and drawing plumbing plans. This course covers basic fire protection systems. The student will learn to design and draw basic fire protection layouts and plans using sprinklers and showing the piping valves and fittings. This course does cover a complete explanation and basic understanding of symbols used on plumbing layouts of fixtures, equipment, piping, valves and fittings.
    Prerequisite(s): CAD 105 Computer Aided Drafting I, CAD 106 Computer Aided Drafting II
    3 credits
  
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    BUI 223 - Building Component - HVAC


    This course covers and utilizes standards and techniques for layout and drawing through the use of CADD software in the development of Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) drawings for buildings. The student will learn to recognize and utilize standard parts and/or symbol libraries to develop and illustrate HVAC features. The student will not only use CADD to create drawings, but will also learn to size the Ductwork and Piping shown on HVAC plans.
    Prerequisite(s): CAD 105 Computer Aided Drafting I, CAD 106 Computer Aided Drafting II
    3 credits
  
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    BUI 225 - Architecture II


    This course continues where BUI 105 Architecture I left off using Revit Software. The course uses the individual building elements and relates to the overall building design. Students already have learned about the make-up of individual building elements. The student will learn how to incorporate those basic elements into architecture plans using Revit. This entire course will relate everything to project completion. The main emphasis will be placed on complete shell design for residential construction and the materials needed to construct it. The students will work on a complete residential project using Revit software as part of the course.
    Prerequisite(s): BUI 105 Architecture I
    3 credits (2 lecture; 1 lab)
  
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    BUI 226 - Civil II


    This course requires the student to use the information learned from Civil I and apply to creating proposed site plans which include grading, roadway and pipeline design. The student will create alignments from existing and proposed centerlines to create profiles. The student can then apply templates for roadway design or use Pipe networks within the CADD program to layout utilities and create corridors. With corridors created to show utilities and roadways ,students can then finalize a project with grading and volume calculations.
    Prerequisite(s): BUI 106 Civil I
    3 credits (2 lecture; 1 lab)
  
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    BUI 298 - Architectural/Civil Internship


    The internship is a credit-worthy opportunity for students to gain experience in their major areas of study by strengthening and expanding their classroom knowledge through practical application. To earn three credits, an intern must satisfactorily complete a minimum of 135 hours on the job.
    Prerequisite(s): Students may intern after earning at least two-thirds of their program and a 2.00 grade point average. All students must apply to intern during the semester prior to the semester in which they plan to earn the internship credits.
    3 credits

BUS - Business

  
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    BUS 101 - Customer Relations


    This course explores methods of customer relationship management. Topics introduced include societal factors affecting customer service, establishing service strategies, consumer expectations, verbal and written communication skills, customer feedback, and identifying consumer perceptions of value. Upon completion of this course the student will be prepared for identifying and providing customer experiences that meet or exceed customer needs.
    3 credits
  
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    BUS 102 - Virtual Employment


    This course explores a common method of employment for many companies: virtual employment, sometimes referred to as working from home. Topics introduced will be the virtual office environment, techniques and technologies, specialty services offered by virtual employees, and communication best practices. Upon completion of this course the student will be prepared for working in a virtual environment.
    3 credits
  
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    BUS 110 - Introduction to Business


    This course examines the social, legal, ethical, economic, and political interactions of business and society. This is a basic foundation for the student who will specialize in some aspect of business and will also provide the opportunity for non-business majors to learn about the relationship and impact of business to a society in which they are citizens, consumers, and producers. The class includes such topics as: economic systems; government and business; ethics and law; social responsibility; globalization; and international business concepts, principles and practices.
    3 credits
  
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    BUS 125 - Management Principles


    This course presents the principles, techniques, and concepts needed for managerial analysis and decision making. It concentrates on the functions of planning, organizing, leading, and motivating behavior in an organization. Principles of organization development introduced will also be discussed.
    3 credits
  
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    BUS 130 - Personal Consumer Finance


    This course is designed to introduce the student to the basic principles of personal finance, with an emphasis on effective money management.  Students will construct a financial plan, using the following concepts: personal financial statements, time value of money, tax planning, banking and interest rates, credit management, personal loans, major purchases and insurances, investment strategies, and retirement/estate planning.
    3 credits
  
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    BUS 165 - Human Resource Management


    This course examines the policies and practices used by human resource management teams to build and maintain an effective workforce. A major issue is the changing role of Human Resources (HR) in organizations. HR was once a clerical function that was relegated to the lower echelons of the organization; today more companies have elevated the HR function to an integral part of the senior planning team. Topics covered include: human resource planning, job analysis, recruitment, selection, performance appraisal, workforce development, compensation, discipline and discharge, workplace safety and health, and labor relations.
    3 credits
  
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    BUS 206 - Operations Management and Process Improvement


    This course is an introduction to the study of operations management and process improvement, its philosophies and tools. It examines the quality dimensions of products and services; the impact of quality on operations and productivity; and the quality management philosophies of Deming, Juran, and Crosby. Additionally, students become familiar with problem solving and some of the primary tools of operations management, including brainstorming, histograms, flow charts, cause and effect diagrams, Pareto charts, and control charts for variables and attributes.
    3 credits
  
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    BUS 210 - Business Law


    This is an introductory course that considers the nature of business law and procedural framework of the legal system. Special interest centers upon current legal issues such as compliance issues, EEOC, employment problems/issues, workers’ compensation, and sexual harassment.
    3 credits
  
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    BUS 220 - Small Business Management


    This course will focus on the challenges faced by entrepreneurs planning to establish or purchase a small business venture. Forms of ownership, financial planning and resources, and basic considerations in operations and control will be discussed. A group project covering these topics will be completed by the class.
    3 credits
  
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    BUS 225 - Business Ethics


    This course considers ethical issues that arise in the context of business needs and practices. We begin by reviewing normative ethical theories, which we will then apply to specific questions that arise in the practice of business-e.g. “In whose interests ought corporations be governed?”, “What obligations do businesses have to protect and preserve the environment?”, “What ethical norms should govern international business ventures?”, “Should employees be fired at-will, or should they only be fired only for just cause?”, etc.
    3 credits
  
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    BUS 230 - Principles of Marketing


    This course will focus on the major elements of the marketing mix, including demand, product planning, pricing, channels, logistics of distribution, and promotion. Principles, functions, and basic problems are also under discussion. The class examines actual practical case studies to assist the student in fully comprehending the nature of marketing.
    3 credits
  
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    BUS 240 - Labor Management Relations


    This course will focus on the major elements of labor management relations. History of the labor movement, labor law, union organizing, and the bargaining for and the administration of labor contracts will be discussed. A contract will be negotiated by the class.
    3 credits
  
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    BUS 298 - Business Management Internship


    The internship is a credit-worthy work opportunity for students to gain experience in their major areas of study by strengthening and expanding their classroom knowledge through practical application in a business setting. Internship credits vary from 2-4 depending on one’s academic goals. To earn one credit, an intern must satisfactorily complete a minimum of 45 hours on the job; two credits equates to 90 hours; three credits includes 135 hours, and four credits requires the completion of 180 hours on the job.
     
    2-4 Credits

CAD - Computer Aided Drafting

  
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    CAD 105 - Computer Aided Drafting I


    This course covers basic Windows, computer and CAD terminology, and basic entity creation and modification all of which are used to produce elementary geometric figures. Students learn to use and control accuracy enhancement tools, use geometric and non-geometric editing commands, control coordinates and display scale, and use layering techniques.
    3 credits (2 lecture, 1 lab)
  
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    CAD 106 - Computer Aided Drafting II


    This course covers and uses standards and techniques for layering and efficient drawing production through the use of CAD library development, including the use of attributes. Students learn to use standard parts and/or symbol libraries, grouping techniques, and query commands to interrogate database, trim surfaces, edit control points, and extract geometric data.
    Prerequisite(s): CAD 105 Computer Aided Drafting I
    3 credits (2 lecture, 1 lab)
  
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    CAD 201 - Computer Aided Drafting 3D


    This course is designed to expose the advanced CAD user to all aspects of 3-D design. Students will work with 3D models, 3D surface models, solid modeling, presentations and application projects. Students will use the latest version of AutoCAD to complete their assigned work.
    Prerequisite(s): CAD 106 Computer Aided Drafting II
    3 credits

CHM - Chemistry

  
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    CHM 106 - Introductory Chemistry


    This course is designed to introduce the student to basic concepts of chemistry and connections of these chemical principles to everyday life. Topics include atomic structure, the periodic table, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, properties of gasses, matter and energy, chemical bonding, acids and bases, nuclear chemistry, and organic chemistry.
    Prerequisite(s): MAT 131 Intermediate Algebra, MAT 117 Technical Math for Trades, or high school algebra
    4 credits (3 lecture, 1 lab)
  
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    CHM 110 - Survey of Organic and Biochemistry


    This course is designed to provide an overview of organic chemistry and biochemistry. Topics include functional groups of organic compounds, the structure and function of carbohydrates, the structure and function of lipids, the structure and function of proteins, and the structure and function of enzymes.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM106 Introductory Chemistry
    4 credits (3 lecture, 1 lab)
  
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    CHM 120 - General Chemistry I


    This course is designed to prepare students for more advanced courses in chemistry and science. The lecture portion of the course focuses on the study of the properties of matter and chemical transformations. Topics include: measurement, chemical nomenclature, chemical reactions and stoichiomentry, atomic theory, molecular structure, thermochemistry, and gas laws. The laboratory will reinforce the lecture topics and emphasize safety technique. This course is a first semester course of a two semester sequence.
    Prerequisite(s): High school chemistry and Algebra (or placement test into College Algebra)
    4 credits (3 lecture, 1 lab)
  
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    CHM 122 - General Chemistry II


    This course is designed to prepare students for more advanced courses in chemistry and science. This course is a continuation of the study of the basic principles of chemistry. Topics include: intermolecular forces, solutions, kinetics, equilibria, acids and bases, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and organic chemistry. The laboratory will reinforce the lecture topics and emphasize safety and technique. This course is a second semester course of a two semester sequence.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 120 General Chemistry I
    4 credits (3 lecture, 1 lab)

CIT - Computer Information Technology

  
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    CIT 100 - Microcomputer Applications


    This hands-on course introduces the student to the more popular microcomputer software packages available including Windows, word processing, spreadsheets, and presentations. This course provides students with a working knowledge of these software packages to accomplish the more common tasks. The Microsoft Office suite, including MS Word, MS Excel and MS PowerPoint, is used.
    3 credits
  
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    CIT 102 - Microsoft Access


    This course introduces students to the basic concepts of database design using Access as the database management system (DBMS). Focus is on the design and management of databases including the creation of database tables, input forms, output reports, and the design of queries against the database using structured query language (SQL). Students are required to design and develop a project database using the various Access constructs.
    Prerequisite(s): CIT 100 Microcomputer Applications
    3 credits
  
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    CIT 103 - Microsoft Excel


    This hands-on course provides students with a working knowledge of the spreadsheet package Microsoft Excel. Students learn the basics of creating a spreadsheet and move into the advanced spreadsheet features such as formatting, charting, reporting, functions, file operations, data management, and what-if analysis.
    Prerequisite(s): CIT 100 Microcomputer Applications
    3 credits
  
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    CIT 105 - Microsoft PowerPoint


    This course provides students with in-depth information on how to create professional presentations through the use of Microsoft PowerPoint. Students create overheads, electronic paper, photo/print and slide presentations. Students learn how to manipulate and control PowerPoint to organize effective and professional presentations.
    Prerequisite(s): CIT 100 Microcomputer Applications
    3 credits
  
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    CIT 107 - Microsoft Word


    This course provides basic as well as advanced information and hands-on training in the use of Microsoft Word for Windows. Students create, edit, format, revise and print documents. Students also learn to add graphics to documents and work with multiple documents as well as sorting and merging techniques.
    Prerequisite(s): CIT 100 Microcomputer Applications
    3 credits
  
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    CIT 110 - Theory of Computing


    This course provides students with an understanding of the components of the computer and how these components coordinate with each other to become a computer system.  Topics covered include hardware and its functions, operating systems and how they coordinate and manage computer activities, computer terminology, and various uses of computers in the home and office, data storage, the future of technology, computer ethics, and other concerns.  This course lays the foundation required in technical education and serves as a stand-alone overview of the use of technology in office automation. 
    3 credits
  
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    CIT 132 - Local Area Networks


    This course provides an overview of data communications and information as it explores the terminology, equipment and procedures that are used as LAN building blocks.  It also covers methods of connecting PCs and the specialized applications that are designed to utilize the special advantages of a networked environment.
    Note(s): Successful completion of CIT 132 Local Area Networks will assist students in passing the CompTIA Network+ Certification exam.
    4 credits
  
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    CIT 165 - Hardware Components


    This course is designed to provide the student with the knowledge and ability to identify various types of computer hardware. The student will become familiar with internal and external hardware and their configurations.
    Note(s): Successful completion of CIT 165 Hardware Components will prepare students to take the first part of the CompTIA A+ Certification exam.
    3 credits
  
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    CIT 166 - Visual Basic Programming


    The student will use Visual Basic to analyze, design, code, test, and debug a computer application using structured programming techniques.  There will be an emphasis on modular programming techniques. 
    3 credits
  
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    CIT 173 - Windows Enterprise Desktop Operating Systems


    This course is designed to provide the student with the knowledge and ability to design, install, and maintain desktop operating system. Students explore advanced aspects of the newest Windows desktop operating system, Windows 7. Topics covered include installation and mass installations, the user interface, hardware and software requirements and support, remote connectivity, networking, and troubleshooting. After successful completion of the course, students will be prepared to take the Microsoft certification exam #70-697.
    3 credits
  
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    CIT 194 - Networking Basics


    This course is designed to introduce the student to the basic elements of telecommunications.  This is also the first of four courses provided in partnership with Cisco Systems that are geared towards providing the student with the knowledge and ability to become Cisco certified as a Cisco Certified Network Administrator.
    5 credits
  
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    CIT 196 - Database Management


    This course discusses database concepts, including structures, integrity, query languages, and more. Students will use an industry-standard database management system to create and work with databases. By the end of this course, student will have a solid understanding of the application of databases in an organization. 
    3 credits
  
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    CIT 201 - Database Management for Healthcare


    This course provides a global understanding of the theory behind data management and the use of database management tools such as the Microsoft Access application for generating relational databases and extracting customized reports from databases. Instruction will be tailored around the use of these tools in handling medical office business operations as well as understanding how they both integrate with electronic health records systems.
    3 credits
  
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    CIT 202 - Management Information Systems


    This course introduces the student to such topics as systems theory, systems analysis, methodologies, and the organizational role of information.  Management considerations and systems security are emphasized.
    3 credits
  
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    CIT 222 - Linux Operating System


    This course provides the student with an introduction to the effective use of the Linux operating system.  Operating system concepts will be reviewed as well as how the Linux system implements these concepts.  We will explore the main areas of the Linux system, including the Linux file system and Linux process execution in a multitasking, multi-user environment.  Special attention will be paid to the Linux shell, with an emphasis on shell programming and using Linux tools as building blocks for more powerful data processing work.
    Note(s): Successful completion of CIT 222 Linux Operating System will prepare students to take the CompTIA Linux+ Certification exam.
    3 credits
  
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    CIT 226 - Windows Server Management


    This course prepares the student to administer networks using the Microsoft Windows Server 2012 operating system and to pass the MCITP 70-410 certification exam. Focusing on updates to the software and in-depth coverage of the administration aspects of Windows Server 2012, this course includes topics such as installing, configuring, managing and troubleshooting Windows Server 2012.
    Prerequisite(s): CIT 132 Local Area Networks
    4 credits
  
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    CIT 228 - Wireless Networking


    The Wireless Networking course will teach students skills in the configuration, implementation, and support of wireless LANs.  Students completing the recommended training are provided with information and practice activities to prepare them for configuring, monitoring, and troubleshooting basic tasks of a WLAN in small to Enterprise networks.
    Prerequisite(s): Student must have completed CIT 194 Networking Basics I if in the Wide Area Network Program or CIT 132 Local Area Networks if in the Network Administration Program.
    3 credits
  
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    CIT 233 - Windows Enterprise Services


    This course will provide the student with the knowledge needed to deploy and configure an organization’s application infrastructures with Microsoft Windows Server 2012.  Students will learn to deploy services such as Certificate Services, IIS, Remote Services, Sharepoint, SANs, and how to set up a network environment.  Upon completion of the course, the student will be well on the way to passing the Microsoft 70-412 Configuring Advanced Windows Server 2012 Services Certification exam.  
    Prerequisite(s): CIT 226 Windows Server Management and CIT 237 TCP/IP Connectivity and Troubleshooting
    3 credits
  
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    CIT 237 - TCP/IP Connectivity and Troubleshooting


    This course is designed to provide the student with a working knowledge of TCP/IP for purposes of internetworking. In this course the student will explore the functionality of the TCP/IP protocol suite, TCP/IP internetworking, and managing TCP/IP. Students will learn IPv4 addressing and subnetting, as well as the new IPv6 addressing and configuration. Troubleshooting techniques appropriate to the server, node and network environment as well as learning how to systematically locate the problem and how to correct it will also be explored.
    Prerequisite(s): CIT 132 Local Area Networks
    3 credits
  
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    CIT 285 - Network Administration Project


    This course is designed as a capstone project for the Network Administration option.  This course will provide the student with the opportunity to perform a major, hands-on project pertaining to this field.
    Note(s): Must be taken in student’s last semester.
    2 credits
  
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    CIT 290 - Network Administration Internship


    The internship is a credit-worthy work opportunity for students to gain experience in their major areas of study by strengthening and expanding their classroom knowledge through practical application. You must earn a total of 3 internship credits. To earn one credit, an intern must satisfactorily complete a minimum of 45 hours on the job; therefore, the intern must complete a total of 135 hours.
    Prerequisite(s): Students may intern after earning at least two-thirds of their program credits and a 2.0 grade point average. All students must apply to intern during the semester prior to the semester in which they plan to earn the internship credits.
    3 credits (135+ hours)
  
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    CIT 292 - Network Security


    Network Security is a hands-on, career-oriented learning solution with an emphasis on practical experience to help students develop specialized security skills to advance their careers. The curriculum provides an introduction to the core security concepts and skills needed for the installation, troubleshooting, and monitoring of network devices to maintain the integrity, confidentiality, and availability of data and devices. It will also help prepare students for entry-level security career opportunities.
    Note(s): Successful completion of CIT 292 Network Security will prepare students to take the CompTIA Security+ Certification exam.
    Prerequisite(s): Student must have completed CIT 194 Networking Basics if in the Wide Area Network Program or CIT 132 Local Area Networks if in the Network Administration program.
    3 credits
  
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    CIT 293 - Wireshark Network Analysis


    Wireshark, a network analyzer, is the de facto industry standard open source product for network troubleshooting, analysis, and security. The curriculum provides in-depth training in using this powerful tool to find network performance issues and identify security breaches. It will also help prepare students for entry-level security career opportunities and prepare them for the Wireshark Certified Network Analyst Exam. This certification exam is certified by the Department of Defense which will also provide opportunities for employment in various government organizations in information technology. Students should have basic computer technology and networking knowledge to be successful in this course.
    Prerequisite(s): CIT 132 Local Area Networks or CIT 194 Network Basics or at least 2 years’ prior experience in computer networking / technology.
    4 Credits
 

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