Aug 15, 2022  
2018 - 2019 Catalog 
    
2018 - 2019 Catalog Archives - Prior Version

Course Descriptions


 

REL - Religion

  
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    REL 100 - World Religions/Religious Studies


    This course examines the nature and development of religion. Students will study the origins, history, and sacred practices of the five major religions of the world, and examine the literary, historical, and cultural contributions of these religions.
    3 credits
  
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    REL 200 - Understanding the Bible


    This course introduces students to the academic study of the Bible (i.e. the Hebrew Bible/Christian Old Testament and the New Testament). It will focus specifically on the origin and transmission of the texts, authorship, major textual themes, basic content, and the historical impact of the Bible. Special attention will be given to the scholarly interpretations of familiar biblical narratives, sermons, and lessons.
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 110 English Composition I
    3 credits
  
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    REL 235 - Philosophy of Religion


    This course critically examines basic religious beliefs and concepts. Special attention is given to arguments for and against the existence of God. Also covered are topics such as the attributes and nature of God, the role of faith and reason in belief, miracles in a scientific age, the possibility of an afterlife, predestination and human freedom, the origin of religious belief, religious disagreement, etc.
    Note(s): This course may also be taken as PHI 235 Philosophy of Religion.
    3 credits

SOC - Sociology

  
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    SOC 100 - Introduction to Sociology**


    This is an introductory course that will familiarize the student with the basic principles and theories associated with sociology.  This course will prepare students to look critically at a variety of social issues.  Critical thinking is emphasized as students are provided thought provoking opportunities in challenging them to examine their diverse world.
    Note(s): **This course is part of the 30 credit transfer framework agreement with the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education universities.
    3 credits
  
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    SOC 200 - Contemporary Social Issues


    This course text examines and debates the nature and causes of each major social problem currently experienced in the United States. The course explores the parameters which define a course as a social problem and then explores social control and social action with respect to each particular problem. All lesson content uses both a micro to macro approach to the problem under study, pointing out the interrelationships among today’s social problems and the several perspectives which can be used to evaluate the problem. Socio-political solutions are presented for each chapter, surveying both political and private attempts to alleviate the problem. Current methods used for studying social problems are examined and practiced. Data relating to social problems is collected and discussed in class. Current issues relating to governmental initiatives, social movements and unintended consequences form the basis of debate. Technology will be a thread throughout the entire course. The ability of technology to influence social problems, positively and negatively, underscores the future solutions to our American social issues.
    Prerequisite(s): SOC 100 Introduction to Sociology
    3 credits
  
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    SOC 205 - Race, Class, and Gender in Society


    This course examines some of the ways societal systems operate to construct our ideas, beliefs, values, behaviors, and attitudes toward ourselves and others, as well as how differences between and among people are created and maintained. Attention will be drawn to differences within society and how hierarchies are established from such perceived differences. Students will examine the concept of social construction and how it can help us see the ways systems of race, class, gender, and sexuality function to establish the boundaries of our lives. The power of words, of definitions, of language itself is explored for students to consider the multiple ways they might participate in or be impacted by structures of domination from a historical and sociological perspective. Topics will be explored through reading original empirical research and review; and utilize APA style research.
    Prerequisite(s): SOC 100 Introduction to Sociology
    3 credits
  
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    SOC 215 - Introduction to Women and Gender Studies


    This course will offer a multidisciplinary and multicultural study of the scholarship on women and gender with two approaches.  First, an introduction to feminist theory and methodology will be provided for a thoughtful approach to how sociocultural constructs of gender influence, and are influenced by, race, ethnicity, class, nationality, and other dimensions of human identity.  Second, an application of culture studies will be utilized to gain valuable insight on how feminist and gender theory likewise are impacted in the arts and literature, throughout history, within philosophy, religion, and language.  Through the combination of social sciences and humanities, it is the goal of this course to familiarize students from an array of academic backgrounds with how the plurality of feminist viewpoints can be integrated into any field of study for a more holistic understanding.
    Prerequisite/Co-requisite(s): SOC 100 Introduction to Sociology
    3 credits
  
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    SOC 250 - Introduction to Social Work


    This course is designed to introduce students to the field of social work and social welfare as an institution and a discipline.  Students survey the social, political, economic and historical dimensions of poverty and welfare services in the United States.  This course is intended to help students think critically, to develop an analytical approach to the value judgments made by social institutions and to broaden the understanding of human diversity and the human condition in the United States. 
    3 credits

SPA - Spanish

  
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    SPA 101 - Spanish I


    This course studies the foundations of Spanish, including pronunciation, basic vocabulary, writing and target language culture.
    3 credits
  
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    SPA 102 - Spanish II


    This course continues building foundations of Spanish, including pronunciation, basic vocabulary, writing and target language culture.
    Prerequisite(s): SPA 101 Spanish I
    3 credits
  
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    SPA 203 - Spanish III


    This course focuses on building functional language proficiency in Spanish, including pronunciation, vocabulary, writing and target language culture.
    Prerequisite(s): SPA 102 Spanish II
    3 credits

SWK - Social Work

  
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    SWK 100 - Introduction to Social Work


    This course is designed to introduce students to the field of social work and social welfare as an institution and a discipline. Students survey the social, political, economic and historical dimensions of poverty and welfare services in the United States. This course is intended to help students think critically, to develop an analytical approach to the value judgments made by social institutions and to broaden the understanding of human diversity and the human condition in the United States.
    3 credits
  
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    SWK 135 - Families in Society


    This course focuses on the family system in the U.S. society, and explores a sociological analysis of the family as a social institution. It introduces students to how sociologists study families including historical development, contemporary patterns in the United States, and possible future trends. A central theme will be diversity and change, as this course explores the many ways families have changed from generation to generation, and the various forms of family diversity in the U.S. society. 
    3 credits
  
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    SWK 210 - Social Welfare


    This course introduces students to the concepts, history, and development of social welfare, social welfare institutions, and social policy within the United States. The 
    course is designed to prepare students to systematically analyze social problems and to gain understanding of the social welfare system in the U.S. The evolution, and 
    current status, of the profession of social work is described as it interfaces with social welfare development, policies, and practices. The role of discrimination, oppression, and inequality in the establishment and implementation of social welfare policies and services is also explored. Social problems of ongoing concern including poverty, 
    health care, and rural issues are highlighted and gaps in policies and programs especially as they link to social and economic justice, diversity, populations at risk, and social work ethics and values are assessed.
    3 credits
  
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    SWK 225 - Ethics In the Social Sciences


    This course is designed to offer an introduction to values and ethics in the social sciences and helping professions, including topics related to moral reasoning, research in the social sciences, ethics theory, multicultural perspectives, intellectual property/legal perspectives, and ethical decision making models. Students will be challenged to develop their own ethical identity and judgment, and to reflect on personal values through course readings, class participation, and case study assessments; with the goal of becoming ethical thinkers and informed decision­ makers. 
    3 credits

TRN - Transfer

  
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    TRN 115 - Introduction to Transfer


    A course focusing on the career and continuing education opportunities of the Liberal Arts and Sciences (previously General Studies) program and other transfer programs. The course offers students the opportunity to explore their own goals in education, potential careers, continuing education, and life at large and the role that further education can play in these. This course is designed for majors in Liberal Arts and Sciences and other transfer programs, and it is designed to accompany the First Year Experience course in the first semester of the student’s two years.
    1 credit

WEL - Welding

  
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    WEL 105 - Welding I


    Instructor demonstrations and practice by the students in basic GMAW/FCAW/SMAW processes. The student will practice flame cutting, gas and arc welding in flat, horizontal, and vertical positions. Emphasis on lab techniques and safety: to include safe and correct methods of assembly, operation of welding equipment and use of grinders.
    3 credits
  
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    WEL 106 - Welding II


     

    Instructor demonstrations and practice by the students involving Vertical and Overhead welding techniques to include Tungsten-Arc Inert Gas (TIG) and Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW). Students will also go over basic welding techniques using Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW).
    Prerequisite(s): WEL 105 Welding I
    4 credits

  
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    WEL 125 - Blueprint Reading for Welders


     

    This course covers the basics for reading blueprints for manufacturing plans. Students will learn about sections, details, assembly plans and subassembly plans. They will learn and understand welding symbols and abbreviations. The study of the welding symbol will include all common weld symbols used in today’s production prints. Students will learn about additional elements included in the welding symbol such as pitch and spacing, roots, backing, melt-thru welds and weldment fabrications. Students will also lean about dimensioning and tolerances.
    3 credits

  
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    WEL 150 - OSHA - Laws and Regulations


    This course provides an overview of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 and the federal agencies created by this act, OSHA and NIOSH. Students will become familiar with OSHA’s general industry standards with particular emphasis on those health and safety compliance standards frequently cited during workplace inspections. In addition, coursework will review the proceedings of an OSHA inspection, penalty structure and litigation procedures.
    3 credits

  
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    WEL 205 - Advanced Welding I


    This course includes the theory, application and skill development of advanced Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW), Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW), Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW), Flux Cored Arc Welding (FCAW), Plasma Arc Cutting (PAC), and Oxygen Arc Cutting (OAC) processes. Skill development for the ARC welding processes will emphasize vertical and overhead “vee” groove joints. Root/face bend tests will be conducted on all test welds. Skill tests will follow either American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) or American Welding Society (AWS) welding code criteria.
    Prerequisite(s): WEL 106 Welding II
    4 credits
  
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    WEL 206 - Advanced Welding II


    This course includes the theory, application and skill development of advanced Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW), Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW), Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW), Flux Cored Arc Welding (FCAW), Plasma Arc Cutting (PAC), and Oxygen Arc Cutting (OAC) processes. Skill development for the ARC welding processes will emphasize vertical and overhead “vee” groove joints. Root/face bend tests will be conducted on all test welds. Skill tests will follow either American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) or American Welding Society (AWS) welding code criteria.
    Prerequisite(s): WEL 205 Advanced Welding I
    4 credits
  
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    WEL 210 - Welding Equipment Repair and Troubleshooting


    This course covers the operation and maintenance of welding equipment. The student will learn various methods of troubleshooting for a variety of problems that occur with welding and cutting equipment. The student will also learn about the different tools that are used for troubleshooting such as the volt-ohm-meter. This course will have the students apply their troubleshooting knowledge to real problems with welding and cutting equipment.
    Prerequisite(s): WEL 105 Welding I
    3 credits
  
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    WEL 215 - Welding Inspection and Code Specifications


    This course covers how to read, write, and interpret specifications and codes for both the American Welding Society (AWS) and American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). The course covers specifications and codes for structural steel welding and pressure vessel welding.
    3 credits
  
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    WEL 220 - Metal Fabrication


    This course provides students with an understanding of metal fabrication. Emphasis will be placed on proper joint selection, design, stresses in welds, material selection, and estimating welding costs. Students will construct projects using common metal fabrication equipment to include welding, shears, ironworker, and metal rollers.
    Prerequisite(s): WEL 106 Welding II
    3 credits
  
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    WEL 230 - Welding Metallurgy and Materials Characterization


    This course covers the manufacturing of metals and alloys. Emphasis is placed on the metal’s properties as to weld ability. The student will study and have demonstrations in the use of tensile tester, impact tester, metallographic, metallurgical microscopes, and polishing techniques.
    Prerequisite(s): MAT 117 Technical Math for Trades
    4 credits
 

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