Aug 16, 2022  
2018 - 2019 Catalog 
    
2018 - 2019 Catalog Archives - Prior Version

Course Descriptions


 

HSC - Health Sciences

  
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    HSC 100 - Medical Terminology


    As a study of the professional language of medicine, this course includes description, interpretation, the building and spelling of medical terms that relate to human anatomy and physiology, health care related diagnostic testing, medical procedures, and various modes of treatment.  The course correlates a basic knowledge of anatomy and physiology.  This course is a foundation course that allows the student to be able to communicate with medical language in other health science courses and prepares the graduate to communicate effectively in the health care arena.
    Co-requisite(s): HSC 130 Basic Anatomy and Physiology
    3 credits
  
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    HSC 110 - Medical Terminology and Body Systems for the Patient Support Care Provider


    This course introduces the student to medical terminology and human anatomy and physiology. Body systems and related terminology are discussed in a primary learning level. Related disease processes, diagnostic procedures, therapeutic measures, and appropriate abbreviations and acronyms are included. This is a foundational course for students entering the field of health care, both clinical and administrative.
    Note(s): Students must earn a “C” or higher in all HSC courses to graduate from the program.
    4 credits
  
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    HSC 115 - Essential Responsibilities for the Health Care Professional


    This course introduces basic communication skills, professionalism and knowledge used in the health care setting. It is designed to develop work behaviors specific to health care in the delivery of quality contributions in the workplace.  Skills emphasized during this course include self-management, problem-solving, and critical thinking. Students will also learn about fundamental regulations related to patient privacy, disabilities, cultural diversity, and laws that protect patients from negligence and incompetence. This course is designed to teach students how to adapt to meet the needs of their patients.
    Note(s): Health science students must earn a “C” or higher in all HSC courses in order to graduate from their respective programs.
    2 credits
  
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    HSC 120 - Health Information Management and Medical Office


    This course presents the theoretical concepts of health information management and performance in the medical office setting. Topics presented include the creation and maintenance of health records and the legal and ethical responsibilities of medical personnel who work in the health information management department. AHIMA and HIPPA regulations are integrated throughout the course. Presented are the various systems available including electronic record keeping. Procedures for maintaining records, methods of numbering, filing and compiling statistics and reports are presented. Included in the course are theory and practice of working in and managing the medical office. Workshops provide a simulated office setting, giving the student practice in diverse medical office procedures. The course is taught in a computer lab to allow students continuous access to electronic record keeping and retrieval programs. Students must have a working knowledge of basic computer applications. MS Word, MS PPT and document storage and retrieval will be the main applications utilized for instruction. Access to the internet, as well as site navigation, will also be necessary.
    Note(s): Students must earn a “C” or higher in all HSC courses in order to graduate from the program.
    3 credits
  
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    HSC 121 - Medical Assisting Administrative I


    This course focuses on the skills needed for entry level practice as a medical assistant in physicians’ offices, outpatient care centers, medical clinics, ambulatory surgical settings and hospitals.  The course addresses professional communication concepts, interpersonal skills, critical thinking, documentation, confidentiality and cutting edge technology, such as electronic health records, necessary for the present day medical assistant.  HIPAA laws as mandated by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services are integrated throughout the course.  In utilizing the classroom setting, this class presents a structured setting to cultivate the administrative skills needed by the medical assistant in the health care arena.  Students will have the opportunity to practice skills with supervision in the clinical laboratory in order to achieve competency.
    Note(s): Students must earn a “C” or higher in all HSC courses to advance in the curriculum and to graduate from the Medical Assisting Technology (A.A.S.) program.
    Prerequisite(s): HSC 100 Medical Terminology; HSC 130 Basic Anatomy and Physiology, with grade of “C” or better.
    3 credits (2 Lecture, 1 Lab)
  
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    HSC 123 - Operational Health Informatics


    Operational Health Informatics offers the student an overview of the field of health informatics and basic computer skills by providing the fundamental concepts of health informatics and how technology is used in the delivery of health care. The course is intended to increase the knowledge and skills of the allied health worker related to the configuration, use, and maintenance of informatics interventions that will evaluate and improve health care delivery.
    Note(s): Health Science students must earn a “C” or higher in all HSC courses to graduate from the program.
    2 credits (1 lecture; 1 lab)
  
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    HSC 125 - Application of Infection Control and Safety Practices


    The purpose of this course is to give the student a working knowledge of Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards and to educate them on bloodborne pathogen safety as well as other important OSHA standards relative to infection control for health care workers. Students will be instructed on the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) related to disease transmission as well as infection control concepts and strategies for preventing occupational exposure. This course also focuses on patient safety and provides the student with instruction on body mechanics, patient transfer, restraints, and fall precautions.  Instruction will be provided on the proper use of medical equipment and supplies related to maintaining a safe patient environment. Student will also be educated on how to respond to emergency situations during this course.
    Note(s): Health science students must earn a “C” or higher in all HSC courses in order to graduate from their respective programs.
    2 credits
  
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    HSC 130 - Basic Anatomy and Physiology


    This course introduces the student to basic human anatomy and physiology. All systems are discussed at a primary learning level. Included is clinical application of related disease processes and diagnostic procedures and therapeutic measures. This is a foundation course for concurrent and upper level courses.
    Co-requisite(s): HSC 100 Medical Terminology
    3 credits
  
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    HSC 140 - Basic Disease Process and Pharmacology


    This course provides an overview of disease processes and introduces students to current concepts in pharmacology. An analysis of how drugs affect all body systems and related diseases is highlighted. Major disease entities, including etiology and symptoms, are presented. Overview of basic drug actions, indications for drug therapy, toxicity, side effects, and safe ranges for therapeutic dosages are presented. This course will include a virtual component enhancing the student’s understanding of the concepts associated with introductory pharmacology. 
    Note(s): Students must earn a “C” or higher in all HSC courses in order to graduate from the program.
    Prerequisite(s): HSC 100 Medical Terminology and HSC 130 Basic Anatomy and Physiology, with a “C” or better
    3 credits
  
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    HSC 142 - Pharmacology for Medical Assisting


    This course introduces drug therapy with an emphasis on drug classification and administration safety. It includes drug actions related to body systems, side effects, and adverse reactions. It also introduces the basic concepts of mathematics used in the calculation of drug dosage and the proper administration procedures. Topics include introduction to pharmacology, calculation of dosages, sources and forms of drugs, drug preparation and administration, drug classification, and drug effects of the body system.   
    Note(s): Students must earn a “C” or higher in all HSC courses in order to graduate from the program.
    Prerequisite(s): HSC 130 Basic Anatomy and Physiology with a “C” or higher.
    3 credits
  
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    HSC 144 - Pharmacology for Pharmacy Technicians


    This course introduces the theoretical background that enables students to provide safe and effective care related to drugs and natural products to persons throughout the lifespan. Students are presented with the concepts of basic pharmacology and the management of drug therapy. It includes examination of the body systems and the related drug therapy within each system. It explores the basic drug groups and key similarities and differences among drugs in each group. Presentation of identifying brand and generic names, dosage forms, doses, quantities, and directions for use of prescription, non-prescription and herbal medications for treating commonly encountered medical conditions is a major portion of this course along with communicating appropriately with other health professionals regarding drug therapy. Drugs are studied by therapeutic or pharmacological class using an organized framework. All modes of handling and dispensing of medications are included.
    3 credits
  
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    HSC 146 - Pharmacology


    This course emphasizes drug therapy as an integral part of health care. Students will develop a theoretical knowledge-base of major drug classifications and be able to relate this knowledge to the pharmacologic aspects of client/patient care. This study of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics assists in analyzing patient responses to drug therapy.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 202 Human Anatomy and Physiology I and BIO 212 Human Anatomy and Physiology Lab I; BIO 204 Human Anatomy and Physiology II and BIO 214 Human Anatomy and Physiology Lab II
    3 credits
  
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    HSC 150 - Medical Assisting Clinical I


    This is an introductory course designed to provide students with an overview of the clinical skills and methods required for employment as a medical assistant. Students will gain experience assisting physicians and other healthcare providers to perform patient centered assessment, examination, intervention and treatment. Emphasis will be placed upon both clinical theory and skills. Beginning skills for the medical assistant will be presented. Communication skills and professional behavior, OSHA standards, infection control, documentation, basic first aid and numerous medical office procedures will be taught. Students will have the opportunity to practice skills with supervision in the clinical laboratory in order to achieve competency.
    Note(s): Students must earn a “C” or higher in all HSC courses to graduate from the Medical Assisting Technology (A.A.S.) program.
    Prerequisite(s): HSC 100 Medical Terminology; HSC 130 Basic Anatomy and Physiology, with grade of “C” or better.
    3 credits (2 Lecture, 1 Lab)
  
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    HSC 151 - Health Assessment and Patient Care Skills


    This course is designed to prepare students with the basic knowledge of patient health assessment. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to provide vital patient care under the direct supervision of a nurse or physician. This course will provide instruction on how to assess vital signs and measurements, how to care for catheters, how to provide oxygen therapy, as well as how to perform ECGs and phlebotomy procedures. Students will learn about the supplies and equipment needed to assist with basic patient care needs such as bathing, toileting, and other activities of daily living (ADL). This course also provides first aid and CPR training.  It is important that students have the opportunity to apply the knowledge learned in this course; therefore, students will be expected to participate in role play, simulation skills, and hands-on practice activities during class time.
    Note(s): Health science students must earn a “C” or higher in all HSC courses in order to graduate from their respective programs.
    2 credits (1 lecture; 1 lab)
  
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    HSC 160 - Law and Ethics for Health Occupations


    The student is introduced to a variety of issues facing health care personnel including legal situations involving health law, functioning within the constraints of applicable law and current challenges facing health care providers. Presented are aspects of medical malpractice, the regulatory environment, contract law, civil versus criminal law and the judicial system. There is an overview of health care ethics with discussion of such issues as the right to life, wrongful life, right to die, euthanasia, anatomical gift legislation, stem cell research and genetic engineering, as well as other ethical issues facing health care workers.
    3 credits
  
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    HSC 167 - Critical Thinking & Ethics in the Health Sciences


    This nonclinical course examines the components of critical thinking, decision making, logic, ethico-legal principles and regulations, and handling difficult situations in the health care environment. The learner clarifies personal values, cultural perspectives, and gains increased appreciation for human uniqueness, autonomy, and freedom of choice.
    3 credits
  
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    HSC 190 - Pharmacy Law and Ethics


    This course prepares the student for practice in both the hospital and community pharmacy internship settings.  It provides student technicians with the legal and ethical information they need to perform their jobs with absolute confidence. It covers all U.S. federal laws regarding pharmacy practice as well as state laws and regulations and their applicability to pharmacy technicians. It also addresses current issues such as herbal medications, privacy laws and rules, and drug pedigree. A unique section on ethics offers extensive discussion points and cases that provide a basis for ethical practice and ethical decision making as a pharmacy technician. Included is extensive information on practice regulation in all states.
    2 credits
  
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    HSC 191 - Pharmacology Calculations


    This course is designed to introduce the student to calculations used in both the hospital and community pharmacy setting.  Methods for converting metric, apothecary and household measurements along with dosage calculations for solids, liquids, dilutions and compounded formulas will be presented.  Calculations for IV admixing are presented along with flow rates.   Patient appropriate calculations are integrated throughout the course.  Interpretation of prescriptions, physician orders, drug labels and medication errors will also be presented and reviewed.
    2 credits
  
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    HSC 192 - Pharmacy Technician Practice


    This course prepares the student for clinical practice. The course provides an overview of the practice of the pharmacy technician and develops the fundamental concepts and principles for success in the field. All activities within the scope of practice are presented. Topics include pharmacy technology, medication distribution systems, repackaging pharmaceuticals, intravenous admixture, compounds, dispensing, billing, managing inventory, and setting-specific activities.
    3 credits
  
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    HSC 205 - Medical Coding ICD-10-CM


    This course will introduce the student to the ICD-10-CM classification of symptoms, conditions and diseases according to the International Classification of Disease Clinical Modification. The diagnosis and procedure coding course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of fundamental concepts of medical reimbursement and health information management systems; focusing on the process of assigning appropriate code numbers to medical diagnoses and procedures to meet patient health record and insurance billing requirements. Emphasis will be placed on coding outpatient medical records.
    Note(s): Students must earn a “C” or higher in all HSC courses in order to graduate from the program.
    3 credits
  
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    HSC 210 - Medical Coding CPT


    Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) is a listing of descriptive terms and identifying codes for reporting medical services and procedures performed by physicians. The terminology provides a uniform language that accurately describes medical, surgical, and diagnostic services and thereby provides an effective means for reliable nationwide communication among physicians, patients, and third parties.
    This course introduces the student to this language (terminology) and challenges them to integrate the knowledge into the medical chart and therefore document necessity of payment for the appropriate medical service and/or procedure.
    Note(s): Students must earn a “C’ or higher in all HSC courses in order to graduate from the program.
    Prerequisite(s): HSC 100 Medical Terminology and HSC 130 Basic Anatomy and Physiology - both with a grade of “C” or better
    3 credits
  
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    HSC 212 - Medical Coding Certification Prep


    CPT (Current Procedural Terminology) codes, ICD-10 (Internal Classification of Diseases) and HCPCS codes are fully integrated to enhance the student’s depth of knowledge. This course will focus on bringing all aspects of coding together and provide the student with a simulated coding internship, preparing them to sit for the American Academy of Professional Coders (AAPC) Certified Professional Coder (CPC) exam.  Real world chart analysis (abstracting) will be the focus that will provide the student with skill advantage over other medical coders.
    Note(s): Students must earn a “C” or higher in all HSC courses in order to graduate from the program.
    Prerequisite(s): HSC 100 Medical Terminology; HSC 130 Basic Anatomy and Physiology; HSC 205 Medical Coding ICD-10-CM; HSC 210 Medical Coding CPT
    4 credits (2 lecture; 2 lab)
  
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    HSC 221 - Medical Assisting Administrative II


    This course builds upon the concepts in HSC 121 Medical Assisting Administrative I, while introducing advanced administrative skills.  All aspects of financial management concepts, including insurance, billing and collections are presented and practiced.  A comparison of electronic and manual systems will be explained and demonstrated.  Confidentiality and other current laws, as they apply to collections, will be integrated throughout the course.  Concepts of office management and human resources are included.  Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to enter the medical assistant field with confidence in their administrative skills.  Students will have the opportunity to practice skills with supervision in the clinical laboratory in order to achieve competency.
    Note(s): Students must earn a “C” or higher in all HSC courses in order to advance in the curriculum and graduate from the program.
    Prerequisite(s): HSC 121 Medical Assisting Administrative I with a grade of “C” or better; Pennsylvania State Police Criminal History Record; Pennsylvania Child Abuse History Clearance
    3 credits (2 Lecture, 1 Lab)
  
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    HSC 230 - Medical Terminology and Anatomy for Coding


    This course carefully sequences learning from simple terminology and basic anatomy (HSC 100 Medical Terminology and HSC 130 Basic Anatomy and Physiology) to complex terminology and anatomy. This course builds upon Greek and Latin word roots and rules in building terms for medical terminology and coding. In this course, students will combine directional terminology, surface anatomy, and terms used to describe anatomical structures related to medical coding. This course will concentrate on the application of previous knowledge to advanced practical application.
    Note(s): Students must earn a “C” or higher in all HSC courses in order to graduate from the program.
    Prerequisite(s): HSC 130 Basic Anatomy and Physiology and HSC 100 Medical Terminology - each with a grade of “C” or better
    Co-requisite(s): HSC 205 Medical Coding ICD -10-CM
    3 credits
  
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    HSC 250 - Medical Assisting Clinical II


    This course builds upon the concepts in HSC 150 Medical Assisting Clinical I while introducing advanced clinical skills. More complex and independent procedures performed by the medical assistant are presented in addition to surgical procedures, physical therapy, principles of diagnostic imaging, and emergency procedures. Included are safety in the laboratory, government regulations, quality assurance, and microscopic procedures and analysis. The student will be involved in rehabilitation, modes of therapy and medication administration. The student is challenged to think critically in various clinical situations. Assessment of health education needs for patients and family is integrated throughout this course. This course offers skill development in the performance of a variety of blood collection methods using proper techniques and universal precautions. There is an emphasis on infection prevention, proper identification, labeling of specimens, specimen handling, and processing. Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to enter the medical assistant field with confidence in their clinical skills.
    Note(s): Students must earn a “C” or higher in all HSC courses in order to graduate from the program.
    Prerequisite(s): HSC 150 Medical Assisting Clinical I with a grade of “C” or better; Pennsylvania State Police Criminal History Record; Pennsylvania Child Abuse History Clearance
    3 credits (2 Lecture, 1 Lab)
  
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    HSC 270 - Diet Therapy for Nursing Students


    Nutrition plays a vital role in maintaining good health and preventing chronic disease. Nutritional therapy in clinical situations is an adaptation of the principles of normal nutrition. Proper application of these principles can maximize restoration of health. This course introduces the nursing student to the fundamentals of medical nutrition therapy with direct application to the nursing process. The course provides an introduction of human nutrition including nutritional requirements, metabolism, and nutritional biochemistry. Nutritional needs and problems across the lifespan are addressed. Nutritional therapeutics for specific disease states are thoroughly examined.
    3 credits
  
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    HSC 275 - Healthcare Administrations/Organizations


    This course reviews the US healthcare delivery system and identifies roles within that system. The scope of the system and its many complex and interrelated components are described, analyzed, defined, and illustrated. The course also covers the concepts of cultural diversity, healthcare law and ethics, stress in the workplace, professionalism, communication and interpersonal relations, and strategies for becoming a successful healthcare employee.
    3 credits
  
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    HSC 280 - Financial Management in Health Care


    This course provides information about the financial aspects of Managed Care in the current health care arena. Included are presentation of the major private sector and governmental health insurances. Operational aspects of financial management in the outpatient and inpatient settings are integrated throughout the course. The methodology of account billing and collections is presented. The necessary regulatory requirements that govern practice management and their impact on health care is stressed.
    3 credits
  
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    HSC 281 - Hospital Practicum for Healthcare Technology


    This internship is a credit-worthy work opportunity for students to gain experience in their major areas of study by strengthening and expanding their classroom knowledge through practical application. The Hospital Practicum will include shadowing hospital healthcare information professionals as well as entry-level work. You will need to complete 2 credit hours for the Healthcare Information Specialist Hospital Practicum. To earn one credit, an intern must satisfactorily complete a minimum of 45 hours on the job.
    Prerequisite(s): Student must be enrolled in the Healthcare Information Specialist (A.A.S.) program in order to enroll in HSC 281 Hospital Practicum for Healthcare Technology. Students may intern after earning at least 30 credits and a 2.0 grade point average. All students must apply to the internship and meet with the faculty internship advisor during the semester prior to the semester in which they plan to earn the internship credits.
    2 credits (90 hours)
  
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    HSC 282 - Office Practicum for Healthcare Technology


    This internship is a credit-worthy work opportunity for students to gain experience in their major areas of study by strengthening and expanding their classroom knowledge through practical application. The Office Practicum will provide students the opportunity to be more closely involved with actual information technology work as they act as a liaison to outside information technology support channels such as hospital and third-party information technology providers. You will need to complete 2 credit hours for the Healthcare Information Specialist Office Practicum. To earn one credit, an intern must satisfactorily complete a minimum of 45 hours on the job.
    Prerequisite(s): Student must be enrolled in the Healthcare Information Specialist (A.A.S.) program in order to enroll in HSC 281 Hospital Practicum for Healthcare Technology. Students may intern after earning at least 30 credits and a 2.0 grade point average. All students must apply to the internship and meet with the faculty internship advisor during the semester prior to the semester in which they plan to earn the internship credits.
    2 credits (90 hours)
  
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    HSC 292 - Medical Assisting Professional Seminar


    This course is a one credit capstone course. This capstone course is an opportunity for students to demonstrate that they have achieved the outcomes of the medical assisting technology program. This course is designed to assess cognitive, affective and psychomotor learning and to do so in a student-centered and student-directed manner which requires the command, analysis and synthesis of knowledge and skills. It integrates learning from the courses in the major with the courses from the rest of the academic experience. It requires the application of that learning to a project which serves as an instrument of evaluation. This course will prepare the student to leave the academic world and enter into the real world as a medical assistant, the most versatile member of any medical staff.
    Note(s): Students will be required to maintain a 2.0 GPA or higher throughout the entire seminar semester. If, at midterm, the student is averaging a GPA less than 2.0, they will be withdrawn from the seminar and will be required to repeat HSC 292 Medical Assisting Professional Seminar in its entirety during the next available semester.
    Prerequisite(s): HSC 121 Medical Assisting Administrative I; HSC 221 Medical Assisting Administrative II; HSC 150 Medical Assisting Clinical I; HSC 250 Medical Assisting Clinical II, all with a grade of “C” or better; satisfactory completion of 40 program credits with a 2.0 GPA or better. Course must be taken in the final semester of the program.
    Co-requisite(s): HSC 293 Medical Assisting Technology Practicum
    1 credit
  
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    HSC 293 - Medical Assisting Technology Practicum


    This course is a credit-worthy work opportunity for students to gain experience in their major areas of study by strengthening and expanding their classroom theoretical knowledge through practical application. This course provides the Medical Assisting Technology student with reality training in the field of health care with an emphasis on medical office skills and clinical practice. Students will be mentored by an experienced supervisor in the agency setting. Satisfactory completion of this experience is required for the completion of the AAS degree in Medical Assisting Technology
    Note(s): Students will be required to maintain a 2.0 GPA or higher throughout the entire internship semester. If, at midterm, the student is averaging a GPA less than 2.0, they will be withdrawn from the internship and will be required to repeat HSC 293 Medical Assisting Technology Practicum in its entirety during the next available semester.
    Prerequisite(s): HSC 121 Medical Assisting Administrative I; HSC 221 Medical Assisting Administrative II; HSC 150 Medical Assisting Clinical I; HSC 250 Medical Assisting Clinical II, all with a grade of “C” or better; satisfactory completion of 40 program credits with a 2.0 GPA or better. Student must be enrolled in the Medical Assisting Technology program; course must be taken in the final semester of the program.
    Co-requisite(s): HSC 292 Medical Assisting Professional Seminar
    4 credits
  
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    HSC 294 - Medical Coding Seminar


    This will be a two-credit capstone course in which students in the medical coding program will have the opportunity to demonstrate skills they have learned throughout the program. Students will be able to apply their knowledge in a simulated capstone project as well as correlate classroom instruction with the real world healthcare environment. Students will be collaborating with medical coding professionals and preparing to enter the workforce as a productive member of the healthcare team.
    Note(s): Students must earn a “C” or higher in all HSC courses in order to graduate from the program. 
    Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled in the Medical Coding Specialist Diploma program. Students may enroll in HSC 294 after satisfactory completion of 15 program credits with a 2.0 GPA or better. Students will be required to maintain a 2.0 GPA or higher throughout the entire seminar semester. Students must obtain the required
    clearances: PA State Police Criminal History Record, PA Child Abuse History Clearance, and FBI Fingerprint Clearance. Also: HSC 100 Medical Terminology, HSC 130 Basic Anatomy and Physiology, HSC 205 Medical Coding /CD-10-CM, HSC 210 Medical Coding CPT, all with a “C” or better.

    2 credits
  
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    HSC 295 - Pharmacy Technician - Hospital Internship


    This course is a credit-worthy work opportunity for students to gain experience in their major areas of study by strengthening and expanding their classroom theoretical knowledge through practical application.  This course provides the Pharmacy Technician student with reality training in the field of hospital pharmacies with an emphasis on identification of appropriate dosage forms, strengths and routes of administration for specific medications. This clinical practice is intended to increase the student’s confidence level and prepare him/her for the beginning of his/her career.  Students will be mentored by an experienced pharmacy technician and registered pharmacist who will incorporate all skills to be performed in a legal and ethical manner.  Satisfactory completion of this experience is required for the completion of the pharmacy technician certificate program.
    Prerequisite(s): HSC 144 Pharmacology for Pharmacy Technicians, HSC 192 Pharmacy Technician Practice. Students may intern with satisfactory progress or completion of HSC 192 Pharmacy Technician Practice and a 2.0 grade point average. All students must register and meet with the faculty internship advisor to intern during the semester prior to the semester in which they plan to earn the internship credits.
    2 credits (90+ hours)
  
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    HSC 296 - Pharmacy Technician - Community Internship


    This course is a credit-worthy work opportunity for students to gain experience in their major areas of study by strengthening and expanding their classroom theoretical knowledge through practical application.  This course provides the Pharmacy Technician student with reality training in the field of community pharmacies with an emphasis on identification of appropriate dosage forms, strengths and routes of administration for specific medications. This clinical practice is intended to increase the student’s confidence level and prepare him/her for the beginning of his/her career.  Students will be mentored by an experienced pharmacy technician and registered pharmacist who will incorporate all skills to be performed in a legal and ethical manner.  Satisfactory completion of this experience is required for the completion of the pharmacy technician certificate program.
    Prerequisite(s): HSC 144 Pharmacology for Pharmacy Technicians, HSC 192 Pharmacy Technician Practice. Students may intern with satisfactory progress or completion of HSC 192 Pharmacy Technician Practice and a 2.0 grade point average. All students must register and meet with the faculty internship advisor to intern during the semester prior to the semester in which they plan to earn the internship credits.
    2 credits (90+ hours)

HST - Histotechnology

  
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    HST 100 - Histotechnology 100


    This course introduces the student to histologic techniques and the histology laboratory. The theory of Histotechnology and Carson, Bancroft and the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP) set the foundation for the established histologic techniques. The clinical practicum provides the student the opportunity to demonstrate basic technical skills and accountability through the application of these techniques and with interaction with the clinical faculty, pathologists, and other laboratory staff.
     
    Prerequisite(s): Must be accepted to the Conemaugh School of Histotechnology
    9 credits (2 Lecture, 7 Lab)
  
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    HST 200 - Histotechnology 200


    This course builds on the concepts learned in HST 100 Histotechnology 100. The student will advance to more complex histologic techniques in the class room and in the histology laboratory. The theory of Histotechnology and Carson, Bancroft and the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP) set the foundation for the established histologic techniques. The clinical practicum provides the student the opportunity to demonstrate basic and more complex technical skills and accountability through the application of these techniques and with interaction with the clinical faculty, pathologists, and other laboratory staff.

     
    Prerequisite(s): HST 100 Histotechnology 100; must be accepted to the Conemaugh School of Histotechnology
    9 credits (2 Lecture, 7 Lab)

  
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    HST 250 - Histotechnology 250


    This course builds on the concepts learned in Histotechnology 100 and 200. The student will advance to becoming a competent Histologic Technician, be prepared for the registry examination and ready for employment. The theory of Histotechnology and Carson, Bancroft and the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP) set the foundation for the established histologic techniques. The clinical practicum provides the student the opportunity to demonstrate basic and more complex technical skills and accountability through the application of these techniques and with interaction with the clinical faculty, pathologists, and other laboratory staff.
    Prerequisite(s): HST 100 Histotechnology 100; HST 200 Histotechnology 200; must be accepted to the Conemaugh School of Histotechnology
    9 credits (1 Lecture, 8 Lab)

HUM - Humanities

  
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    HUM 100 - Introduction to Humanities


    The course is an exploration of the Western humanities through its various disciplines: philosophy, theater, film, architecture, literature, religion, art, and music. It will focus on the development of human creative expression from prehistoric times to the present; and, in doing so, will teach us about who we are.
    3 credits
  
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    HUM 215 - Introduction to Women and Gender Studies


    This course will offer a multidisciplinary and multicultural study of the scholarship on women and gender with two approaches.  First, an introduction to feminist theory and methodology will be provided for a thoughtful approach to how sociocultural constructs of gender influence, and are influenced by, race, ethnicity, class, nationality, and other dimensions of human identity.  Second, an application of culture studies will be utilized to gain valuable insight on how feminist and gender theory likewise are impacted in the arts and literature, throughout history, within philosophy, religion, and language.  Through the combination of social sciences and humanities, it is the goal of this course to familiarize students from an array of academic backgrounds with how the plurality of feminist viewpoints can be integrated into any field of study for a more holistic understanding.
    Prerequisite(s): SOC 100 Introduction to Sociology
    3 credits

HUS - Human Services

  
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    HUS 100 - Introduction to Human Services


    This course is an overview of human services and is required of all human services majors. It is designed to help students examine and understand basic concepts required to work in the human services field. It is designed for students presently working or planning a career in applied human services in positions such as nutrition aide, health care assistant, law enforcement, corrections, child care provider, victims services assistant, social service worker, therapeutic support staff, group home worker, or activity professional. Topics examined include ethics, professional confidentiality, and legal liabilities in addition to the processes and history of helping and referral resources. This introductory course in human services is intended to:

    • Encourage students to focus on increasing their knowledge of their intended field
    • Assist students in examining the workers role in the helping process
    • Examine personal values
    • Introduce the development of ethical standards of interaction with others.

    Note(s): Students engage in 35 hours of community service learning and must present current ACT 34 and ACT 151 clearances to complete course requirements.
    3 credits
  
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    HUS 200 - Interviewing and Case Management


    The job of a case manager or assistant is pivotal in coordinating all of the services provided to consumers. This course focuses on empowering clients to manage their own lives during the case management process, from the intake interview until termination. Important skills such as interviewing, report writing, service documenting, case planning, and supervision are explored and practiced in the classroom and in the field through service learning opportunities. Students learn how to develop a plan for services, identify services, and gather information through the interviewing process. The elements of crisis intervention are explored.
    Note(s): Students engage in 35 hours of related service learning. Students may need to present approved current ACT 34 and ACT 151 clearances to complete course requirements.
    Prerequisite(s): HUS 100 Introduction to Human Services
    3 credits
  
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    HUS 210 - Community Intervention and Social Policy


    Human Service workers are required to live and work in a context of social change in a variety of social systems.  It is important that they know how to analyze social systems and how to intervene to make positive changes on behalf of their clients.  This course is intended to provide the theoretical concepts and practical tools to enable students to be effective advocates for their clients within their organizations and beyond the local community level.  This advanced course in human services is intended to:

    • Enable the student to use important concepts in social policy development and community intervention to understand the process social policy creation and social change the organizational, community, county, state, and national levels.
    • Enable students to work for positive social change
    • To empower the student to take charge and make positive changed in their own communities

    Note(s): Students engage in 35 hours of related service learning experience. Students may need to present approved current ACT 34 and ACT 151 clearances to complete course requirements.
    Prerequisite(s): HUS100 Introduction to Human Services
    3 credits
  
  •  

    HUS 295 - Human Services Internship


    The internship is the field experience for students majoring in Human Services, and utilizes a concurrent model of field education. This model affords students the opportunity to simultaneously practice in the field and uses seminars as a forum to improve their service skills and enhances their teaming skills. Students coordinate their internship experience with the faculty internship advisor and the site supervisor at the location of the field experience. The internship is designed to enable the student to experience increasing levels of responsibility within the fieldwork facility. The field experience is a minimum of 140 hours on site, along with 10 hours in a scheduled internship seminar. Students may intern at their work site with approval from the faculty internship advisor or may choose an internship position available in the community. Students must present current ACT 34 and ACT 151 clearances to complete internship requirements.
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of 46 college credits and completion of all required 100 level courses and a minimum of one 200 level course in the Human Services Program; current Act 34 Child Abuse Clearance and Act 151 Pennsylvania State Police Criminal Background Check. Some internship sites may also require FBI Federal Fingerprint Clearance.
    3 credits (140 clock hours, 10 hours of seminar)

ICR - College Reading

  
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    ICR 020 - Basic College Reading


    This course is designed to strengthen the reading skills necessary for college success.  Emphasis is on vocabulary, transitional words, paragraph organization, comprehension skills, and learning strategies.  The grade for this course does not contribute to the Quality Point Average for the semester, is not generally transferable, and does not count toward graduation. 
    3 institutional credits
  
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    ICR 031 - Critical College Reading


    This course focuses on the reading skills that students will encounter in various collegiate academic areas.  Topics include summarizing, paraphrasing, note taking, outlining, and mapping.  Skills are acquired through readings in specific disciplines.  Print media, electronic media, graphics, and visuals are also examined to improve critical thinking and analysis.  The grade for this course does not contribute to the Quality Point Average for the semester, is not generally transferable, and does not count toward graduation. 
    3 institutional credits

LIB - Library

  
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    LIB 100 - Information and Research


    In this class students will learn how to identify an information need, identify resources to meet that need, evaluate the resources, and understand how to use the resources effectively thereby avoiding plagiarism. Students will learn both APA and MLA citation styles.
    3 credits

LIF - Health and Wellness

  
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    LIF 111 - Health and Wellness


    Healthy lifestyle behaviors contribute to wellness throughout the life cycle.  This is a health science course that explores variables related to achieving a longer and healthier life.  This course discusses how informed personal choices in regards to behavior, exercise, food intake and preservation/protection of our environment can promote health and wellness.  This course looks at personal behavior choices in regard to various health issues such as stress management, chronic disease, HIV, sexually transmitted disease, eating disorders, alcohol and drug abuse, allergies and food intolerances.  Healthy living must be rehearsed and practiced in order to be fully understood.  For this reason, students will have the opportunity to participate in several activities related to healthier living. These activities (also known as “Hands-On Health Labs”) will demonstrate methods for implementing the healthy lessons being taught in the classroom.  The goal is for students to use this new knowledge to make informed choices and learn how to live a longer, fuller, healthier life.
    3 credits
  
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    LIF 130 - Biohazard Seminar


    The nature of working with people, either on a continuing or incidental basis, always poses the potential for exposure to infectious blood and other bodily fluids. OSHA regulations require that workers with potential exposure receive and maintain annual training on bloodborne and other pathogens (including other potentially infectious fluids and wastes). This serves as the initial training for students seeking careers in the service and health sectors and provides continuing education for workers who need to maintain or upgrade their knowledge in the area of personal protective equipment (PPE) and behaviors. This course provides written, classroom and hands-on experience in the requirements for PPE and explores legal requirements and ethical considerations.  Students also examine food safety, hazard communications, and complete fire safety training. 
    1 credit

MAT - Mathematics

  
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    MAT 085 - Algebra Fundamentals


    This course is designed to prepare students for college-level mathematics.  Topics include a review of fractions, decimals, and percents, followed by introductory levels of variable expressions, linear equations, polynomials, factoring, exponents, and graphing linear equations.  This course will not count toward graduation, will not earn college credit, and will not be used in QPA calculations.  
    Prerequisite(s): Placement examination
    3 institutional credits
  
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    MAT 110 - Business Mathematics


    This course is designed to give students expanded fundamental knowledge of mathematical applications for personal use and business applications. A review of fractions, decimals, percents, and formulae are included in the course. Topics include basic statistics, insurance, discounts, markup, markdown, inventory, interest, consumer credit, banking, payroll, taxes, financial statements, depreciation, and investments.
    Prerequisite(s): MAT 085 Algebra Fundamentals or by placement exam.
    3 credits
  
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    MAT 115 - Construction Math


    This course is to prepare the student for the mathematics use in building construction. Topics include applying basic mathematics to calculate spacing and sizing of Roof Rafters, Overhangs, and Stairs as used in building construction. Use of geometry for the calculation of building materials needed.
    Prerequisite(s): MAT 085 Algebra Fundamentals or by placement exam.
    3 credits
  
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    MAT 116 - Mathematical Concepts & Applications


    The objective of this course is to cultivate an appreciation of the significance of mathematics in daily life. Topics include mathematical reasoning, problem-solving, geometry, probability, statistics, logic, personal finance and non-technical applications of mathematics in the modern world.
    Prerequisite(s): MAT 085 Algebra Fundamentals or by placement examination
    3 credits
  
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    MAT 117 - Technical Math for Trades


    This course is designed to prepare students for mathematics they will use working in technical and trade fields. The student will review basic math skills working with whole number, decimals, and fractions. The student will learn applied geometry, basic algebraic operations, and introduction to trigonometric functions. Application problems will allow students to use the concepts that are learned to solve practical problems.
    Prerequisite(s): MAT 085 Algebra Fundamentals or by placement exam.
    3 credits
  
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    MAT 126 - Elements of Mathematics I


    Elements of Mathematics is a content course which broadens and deepens the student’s knowledge of the mathematics content of early childhood and middle school as a framework for learning to teach mathematics. In the course, students use a variety of materials for learning, work with conceptual models, use conceptual models to perform mathematics, perform activities that develop new perspectives, and demonstrate competence in mathematics. This course enables our students to become insightful professionals who are able to understand and communicate mathematic principles to others.
    Prerequisite(s): MAT 085 Algebra Fundamentals or by placement exam.
    3 credits
  
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    MAT 127 - Elements of Mathematics II


    Elements of Mathematics II is a continuation of MAT 126 Elements of Mathematics I which increases the students’ mathematical knowledge and expands the student’s understanding of the mathematics content of early childhood and middle school as a framework for learning to teach mathematics. In the course, students use a variety of materials for learning, work with conceptual models, use conceptual models to perform mathematics, perform activities that develop new perspectives, and demonstrate competence in mathematics. This course enables our students to become insightful professionals who are able to understand and communicate mathematic principles to others.
    Prerequisite(s): MAT 126 Elements of Mathematics I
    3 credits
  
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    MAT 131 - Intermediate Algebra


    This course is designed to prepare students for higher level mathematics through a mastery of algebraic concepts. Topics include factoring, laws of exponents, polynomials, equations and linear inequalities, graphing (using linear equations and inequalities), functions, rational expressions, and radicals.
    Prerequisite(s): MAT 085 Algebra Fundamentals or by placement exam.
    3 credits
  
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    MAT 145 - College Algebra


    Students enrolled in this course should have a strong background in basic and intermediate algebra. Topics include a more in-depth study of expressions, solving equations, solving inequalities, circles, and a detailed study of functions including polynomial, logarithmic, and exponential functions.  
    Prerequisite(s): MAT 131 Intermediate Algebra, with a grade of “C” or better or by placement exam.
    3 credits
  
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    MAT 170 - Precalculus


    This course is designed for the student who needs to strengthen the algebraic, geometric, and trigonometric skills necessary for calculus.  Topics include a detailed study of graphs, functions (including polynomial, rational, and trigonometric functions), analytic trigonometry, systems of equations and inequalities, vectors, and limits. 
    Prerequisite(s): MAT 145 College Algebra or by placement exam
    3 credits
  
  •  

    MAT 200 - Probability and Statistics


    This course provides the student with an opportunity to learn and apply mathematical concepts.  Applications include problems from various fields.  Sources of data, sampling, collection methods and processing of statistical data, frequency distributions, measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability theory, confidence intervals, tests for significance, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression analysis will be covered.  Emphasis will be placed on concepts, definitions, and analysis.  Most calculations will be done through MyStatLab with StatCrunch while a few will be done with formulas and a scientific calculator.
    Prerequisite(s): MAT 110 Business Mathematics, MAT 126 Elements of Mathematics I, MAT 131 Intermediate Algebra or higher (or by placement test).
    3 credits
  
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    MAT 204 - Discrete Mathematics


    This course is designed to foster an understanding of mathematical ideas and how to use formal proof techniques to determine the validity of these ideas.  The topics include sets, set theory, formal proof techniques, relations and functions, algorithms, number theory, and proper mathematical terminology and notations.
    Prerequisite(s): MAT 145 College Algebra
    3 credits
  
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    MAT 205 - Applied Calculus for Business


    Students enrolled in this course should have a strong background in college-level algebra. Topics include a review of functions and an introduction to the basic concepts of calculus. These concepts include limits, differentiation, curve sketching, and integration. An emphasis will be placed on application problems.
    Prerequisite(s): MAT 145 College Algebra or by placement test
    4 credits
  
  •  

    MAT 210 - Calculus I


    This course is designed as the first calculus course for students pursuing degrees in mathematics, engineering, or the natural sciences. Students are introduced to the basic concepts of calculus including limits, continuity, derivatives, applications of derivatives, and integration. Logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric functions are included.
    Prerequisite(s): MAT 170 Precalculus or by placement exam
    4 credits
  
  •  

    MAT 220 - Calculus II


    This course is designed as the second calculus course for students pursuing degrees in mathematics, engineering, or the natural sciences. Topics include differentiation and integration of transcendental functions, more advanced integration techniques, applications of integration, L’Hôpital’s Rule, improper integrals and infinite series.
    Prerequisite(s): MAT 210 Calculus I
    4 credits
  
  •  

    MAT 230 - Calculus III


    This course is designed as the third calculus course for students pursuing degrees in mathematics, engineering, or the natural sciences. Topics include conics and polar coordinates, vectors and vector-valued functions, functions of several variables including partial derivatives and multiple integration.
    Prerequisite(s): MAT 220 Calculus II
    4 credits
  
  •  

    MAT 240 - Differential Equations


    This course is designed to prepare students for higher level mathematics through a mastery of mathematical modeling. Differential Equations uses these models to analyze such concepts as growth, decay, falling objects and other problems from physics and engineering.
    Prerequisite(s): MAT 230 Calculus III
    4 credits

MPR - Media Production

  
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    MPR 100 - Introduction to Production


    Students learn the basics of audio and video production by means of exploring the fundamentals of production: media aesthetics, audience analysis, choice of medium, visual writing, and more. The course covers theory, terminology, and techniques. Basic technical and aesthetic skills of both radio production and television studio production are covered. Students apply these fundamentals by participating in hands-on group projects.
    3 credits
  
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    MPR 130 - Radio Production


    This course introduces the student to digital audio radio production through Adobe Audition software in the classroom and in the college’s Black Bear Audio Lab. The student will learn the production theories and then produce digital audio presentations for radio and electronic-based media applications. These productions will also be used to create an audio portfolio for each student.
    3 credits (2 Lecture, 1 Lab)
  
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    MPR 150 - Television Production


    This course is designed to offer instruction and practice in the basic skills necessary for the conception, storyboarding, writing, production and post-production of television programs and commercials.  Students will be exposed to the selection and integration of program and production elements.  The course also provides for the experimentation and application of aesthetic and conceptual elements, as well.  The students will spend time writing and researching various video projects as assigned. 
    3 credits
  
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    MPR 200 - Scripting for Radio, Television, and e-Media


    The average American is exposed to more than 3,000 advertisements and media messages each day, but recalls only about a dozen. To write creative and memorable messages that stand out in the marketing departments of local, national, and international organizations, skill is required. This course introduces the student to effective copywriting for radio, television, and e-based platforms.
    3 credits
  
  •  

    MPR 230 - Basic News Writing


    This course introduces the student to broadcast, electronic and print news and examines how reporters gather and deliver news stories. It also explores the various factors that affect news reporting and presentation. Students write short and long form news stories that will be recorded and aired in newscasts. Students learn how to write in news style and write various types of news stories with an emphasis on broadcast as well as online newsletters, electronic bulletin boards and the internet. Through lectures, discussions, video and audio and guest speakers from area media, students learn about the responsibility and role of news reporters in society.
    3 credits
  
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    MPR 250 - Video Production


    Video production combines essential storytelling along with the technical skills needed to make the story come alive. The fundamentals of video production will be studied including the production process, the production team, the function and elements of the camera, proper mounting, balance, and composition. An introduction to creating, editing, and producing digital video, the course will enable students to use digital video terminology and video editing including adding transitions, special effects, music, sound effects, and voice-overs, graphics, and titles.
    3 credits
  
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    MPR 270 - New Media Production


    New media production offers hands-on instruction in multimedia and emerging new media technologies.  Students learn to use new media technologies effectively for different types of communication. The scope of the course will cover application areas of new media. Digital, visual, and media literacy will be improved as content generators.
    3 credits
  
  •  

    MPR 290 - Media Literacy


    This course in media literacy introduces both theoretical and applied constructs and techniques in order to promote critical consumption and production of media content. Media analysis techniques, media reviews, and exercises are used to enhance overall student knowledge of the topic area.
    3 credits
  
  •  

    MPR 299 - Media Production Practicum


    This is the capstone course for the Media Production Associate of Applied Science Degree. This course offers supervised experience in video/television/new media broadcasting with emphasis in the planning, production, and editing of electronic media. Projects or outside experience in the field must be cleared by the instructor. Sixty hours of supervised outside work is the minimum, with the addition of 15 hours of classroom instruction. Assignments or professional experience may be offered through Pennsylvania Highlands. Practicum class includes the completion of portfolio materials.
    3 credits (1 Lecture, 2 Lab)

MUS - Music

  
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    MUS 100 - Introduction to Music


    This course is an introduction to music that studies the elements of music (notation, scales, meter, rhythm, intervals) instruments of the orchestra, vocalization, and the lives and works of composers from the Middle Ages, Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Contemporary eras. Use is made of recordings, concerts, and other media.
    3 credits
  
  •  

    MUS 200 - Popular American Music in the Twentieth Century


    Popular American Music in the Twentieth Century reviews the basic elements of music, surveys the history of popular music in America from the invention of the phonograph (1877) to the present, and explores the use of music as a social, cultural, and political mirror and influence on the society we live in. Supplemental recordings, concerts, and other media are used as tools in the study of American music.
    3 credits

PHI - Philosophy

  
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    PHI 100 - Critical Thinking


    In this course, students develop the ability to form and critically evaluate arguments. In the beginning, special attention is given to informal logic (especially logical fallacies) and to understanding strong deductive, inductive, and abductive inferences. The remainder of the course is devoted to practical applications of critical thinking skills to topics such as claims made about ghosts, ESP, astrology, UFO abductions, relativism, conspiracy theories, advertising, political speech, media, etc.
    3 credits
  
  •  

    PHI 110 - Introduction to Philosophy**


    This course introduces students to traditional philosophical problems. The course will survey basic topics in philosophy and the great ideas that changed history. Students will examine classical and contemporary texts on the nature of reality, truth, morality, goodness, justice, the possibility of knowledge, faith, reason, and the existence of God.
    Note(s): **This course is part of the 30 credit transfer framework agreement with the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education universities.
    3 credits
  
  •  

    PHI 200 - Introduction to Ethics


    We, typically, describe our actions as right or wrong, good or bad. In the first half of this course, we will address theoretical questions about the foundations of our standards of right and wrong and questions about systems for distinguishing right from wrong actions/character traits. The second half of the course will be devoted to applying our answers to the theoretical questions to specific issues, including drugs, casual sex, illegal immigration, torture, abortion, etc. In more technical terms, the course is a survey of metaethics, normative ethics, and applied ethics.
    3 credits
  
  •  

    PHI 235 - Philosophy of Religion


    This course critically examines basic religious beliefs and concepts. Special attention is given to arguments for and against the existence of God. Also covered are topics such as the attributes and nature of God, the role of faith and reason in belief, miracles in a scientific age, the possibility of an afterlife, predestination and human freedom, the origin of religious belief, religious disagreement, etc.
    Note(s): This course is cross-listed as REL 235 Philosophy of Religion.
    3 credits
  
  •  

    PHI 240 - Bioethics


    This course considers ethical issues that arise in the context of medicine and biotechnology. After reviewing normative ethical theories, we will apply those theories to topics such as obligations to patients, the role of physicians, the responsibilities of nurses, patient autonomy, informed consent, confidentiality, human and animal research, the implementation of advance directives and DNR orders, suicide and euthanasia, abortion, stem cell research, reproductive technologies, genetic enhancement, and governmental healthcare policies.
    3 credits
  
  •  

    PHI 245 - Symbolic Logic


    This course introduces students to formal patterns of reasoning. It will cover general topics in logic (arguments, sentences, deductive validity, equivalence, consistency, tautologies, contradictions, etc.), sentential logic (connectives, truth tables, sentences in sentential logic, etc.), and predicate calculus (quantification, semantics, models, proofs, etc.). Any student interested in forming and analyzing good arguments will enjoy this class, and those involved with computer science or mathematics will find it especially beneficial.
    Prerequisite(s): MAT 145 College Algebra
    3 credits

PHY - Physics

  
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    PHY 102 - Concepts of Physics


    The course introduces students to phenomena, concepts, and principles of Physics at an introductory level. Topics will include light, waves, sound, energy, electricity, states of matter and Newton’s Laws. This course is for students who may not have had prior Physics instruction. The course is required for Welding and Architectural/Civil (CAD) and Design Technology Majors but applicable for many other majors who need a three or four credit science.
    Prerequisite(s): MAT 115 Construction Math, MAT 117 Technical Math for Trades, or MAT 131 Intermediate Algebra.
    Co-requisite(s): PHY 103 Concepts of Physics Lab (if applicable to student major, required for Welding and Architectural/Civil (CAD) and Design Technology Majors)
    3 credits
  
  •  

    PHY 103 - Concepts of Physics Lab


    The course illustrates many of the topics introduced in lecture through hands-on laboratory experiments. Experiments in laboratory are conducted, but not limited to, the topics of force, acceleration, gravity, friction, circular motion, matter, temperature, and the Law of Reflection.
    Prerequisite(s): MAT 115 Construction Math, MAT 117 Technical Math for Trades, or MAT 131 Intermediate Algebra
    Co-requisite(s): PHY 102 Concepts of Physics
    1 credit
  
  •  

    PHY 110 - Physics (Algebra-based) I


    Among the topics covered are the kinematics and dynamics of linear motion, the conditions for static equilibrium, the principles of conservation of energy and of momentum, Newton’s law of gravitation, the kinematics and dynamics of rotational motion, mechanics of solids and fluids and thermodynamics. This course is recommended for Environmental Program students and students wishing to transfer an algebra based Physics course to a four-year institute.
    Prerequisite(s): MAT 115 Construction Math, MAT 117 Technical Math for Trades, or MAT 131 Intermediate Algebra
    Co-requisite(s): PHY 111 Physics (Algebra-based) I Lab
    3 credits
  
  •  

    PHY 111 - Physics (Algebra-based) I Lab


    The course illustrates many of the topics introduced in lecture through hands-on laboratory experiments. Experiments in laboratory are conducted, but not limited to, the topics of force, acceleration, gravity, friction, circular motion, matter, and temperature.
    Prerequisite(s): MAT 115 Construction Math, MAT 117 Technical Math for Trades, or MAT 131 Intermediate Algebra
    Co-requisite(s): PHY 110 Physics (Algebra-based) I
    1 credit
  
  •  

    PHY 115 - Physics (Algebra-based) II


    Among the topics covered are thermodynamics, electric concepts, magnetic concepts, waves and atomic theory. This course is recommended for Environmental Program students and students wishing to transfer an algebra-based Physics course to a four-year institution.
    Prerequisite(s): MAT 115 Construction Math, MAT 117 Technical Math for Trades, or MAT 131 Intermediate Algebra, PHI 110 Physics (Algebra-based) I
    Co-requisite(s): PHY 116 Physics (Algebra-based) II Lab
    3 credits
  
  •  

    PHY 116 - Physics (Algebra-based) II Lab


    The course illustrates many of the topics introduced in lecture through hands-on laboratory experiments. Experiments in laboratory are conducted, and include, but are not limited to, topics including wave motion, electricity and magnetism, light, geometrical and physical optics as well as relativity and quantum theory.
    Prerequisite(s): MAT 115 Construction Math, MAT 117 Technical Math for Trades, or MAT 131 Intermediate Algebra, PHY 110 Physics (Algebra-based) I, and PHY 111 Physics (Algebra-based) II Lab
    Co-requisite(s): PHY 115 Physics (Algebra Based) II
    1 credit
  
  •  

    PHY 120 - Physics (Calculus-based) I


    An introduction to mechanics. Among the topics covered are the kinematics and dynamics of linear motion, the conditions for static equilibrium, the principles of conservation of energy and of momentum, Newton’s law of gravitation, the kinematics and dynamics of rotational motion, mechanics of solids and fluids and thermodynamics. Differential and integral calculus and simple vector analysis are used throughout. This course is recommended for students planning to transfer to four year institutions as engineering, physical science, premed, and computer science majors.
    Prerequisite(s): MAT 210 Calculus I
    Co-requisite(s): PHY 121 Physics (Calculus-based) I Laboratory
    3 credits
  
  •  

    PHY 121 - Physics (Calculus-based) I Laboratory


    The course illustrates many of the topics introduced in lecture through hands-on laboratory experiments. Experiments in laboratory are conducted, but not limited to, the topics of force, acceleration, gravity, friction, circular motion, matter, and temperature.
    Prerequisite(s): MAT 210 Calculus I
    Co-requisite(s): PHY 120 Physics (Calculus-based) I
    1 credit
  
  •  

    PHY 130 - Physics (Calculus-based) II


    A continuation of PHY 120 Physics (Calculus-based) I. Topics include wave motion, electricity and magnetism, light, geometrical and physical optics. Differential and integral calculus and simple vector analysis are used throughout. This course is recommended for students planning to transfer to four year institutions as engineering, physical science, premed, and computer science majors.
    Prerequisite(s): MAT 210 Calculus I, PHY 120 Physics (Calculus-based) I, PHY 121 Physics (Calculus-based) I Laboratory
    Co-requisite(s): PHY 131 Physics (Calculus-based) II Laboratory
    3 credits
  
  •  

    PHY 131 - Physics (Calculus-based) II Laboratory


    The course illustrates many of the topics introduced in lecture through hands-on laboratory experiments. Experiments in laboratory are conducted, but not limited to, the topics of electrostatic fields and Gauss’ law, electric potential, electric circuits, magnetic fields, Ampere’s law, Faraday’s law, inductance, Maxwell’s equations, electromagnetic waves and optics.
    Prerequisite(s): MAT 210 Calculus I, PHY 120 Physics (Calculus-based) I, PHY 121 Physics (Calculus-based) I Laboratory
    Co-requisite(s): PHY 130 Physics (Calculus-based) II
    1 credit

PSY - Psychology

  
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    PSY 100 - General Psychology**


    This course is a general introduction to the scientific study of the brain, behavior, and mental processes of humans and animals, with emphasis on the goals of psychology: to describe, explain, predict, and control behavior. Students examine the substance of psychology such as biopsychology, sensation and perception, learning, memory, cognitive processes, affective behaviors, and mental illness through an examination of the theories, principles, and methods of research used in the field. Examples and applications enable the student to acquire the elements of critical thinking as adapted to the research environment. Students produce an APA formatted research paper. This course applies the fundamental principles of psychology as a natural science. Students explore current research through reading original empirical research and write an APA formatted analytic research paper.
    Note(s): **This course is part of the 30 credit transfer framework agreement with the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education universities.
    3 credits
  
  •  

    PSY 130 - Human Development Across the Lifespan


    This course covers various aspects of human development across the life span. It focuses on theoretical issues, developmental tasks, human differences, and applications of the knowledge with the area of human development. Human development is a broad field that looks at the changes, processes, and challenges encountered in daily living. Life span development examines the body of knowledge we call development. This course will expose students to the wide range or environmental factors, from physical to multicultural, aging, typical and atypical interactions between the organism and the environment, the normal and the challenges, the success and the failures of living.
    3 credits
  
  •  

    PSY 200 - Abnormal Psychology


    This course examines behaviors currently described as psychological disorders, as well as theoretical, clinical, and experimental perspectives of the study, diagnosis, and treatment of psychopathology. Emphasis is placed on terminology, classification, etiology, assessment, and treatment of the major disorders. Upon completion, students should be able to distinguish between normal and abnormal behavior patterns, as well as demonstrate knowledge of etiology, symptoms, and therapeutic techniques. Students explore current research through reading original empirical research.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 100 General Psychology
    3 credits
  
  •  

    PSY 210 - Psychology of Aging


    This upper-level course examines the implications of living longer, applying the biopsychosocial model to the study of the aging process from several cultural and contextual perspectives. A variety of attitudes, myths and stereotypes about aging are discussed. Aging is viewed from the perspective of America’s past view of the elderly to an emerging view of the elder individual as an important contributor to society. A strengths approach to the aging process is examined and contrasted against the usual medical model of aging. The course examines aging issues with special emphasis on the supportive role of the Human Services worker in the area of mental health. Current research and research methods are integrated into the coursework through writing assignments. Service-learning may be required.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 100 General Psychology
    3 credits
  
  •  

    PSY 215 - Death and Dying


    This course provides a comprehensive overview of the study of death and dying, covering the key issues and questions in the field.  We look at the personal and social attitudes regarding death in our society as well as those of other cultures and times.  This class draws upon sociological, psychological, anthropological, historical, medical, and spiritual investigations into the subject of death.  As you review your textbook, you will find coverage of death-related issues ranging from personal confrontations with mortality to the study of large-scale encounters with death such as disaster and terrorism.
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 110 English Composition I
    3 credits
  
  •  

    PSY 220 - Introduction to Counseling


    This course is a general introduction to the profession of counseling with emphasis on ethics and the client-counselor relationship. Students examine the role and function of the counselor, self-reflection, and current issues in counseling. Examples and applications enable the student to acquire the elements of critical thinking as adapted to the research environment. Students produce an APA formatted research paper. Students explore current research through reading original empirical research.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 100 General Psychology
    3 credits
  
  •  

    PSY/SOC 202 - Introduction to Research


    This course is an introduction to research in Human Services and the Behavioral Sciences. Students learn conceptual foundations of psychological research, including the nature of psychology as a science, the ethics of research, research designs, the nature of research variables, and the logic of research design and statistical analysis. Topics include empirical, qualitative, survey research, and program evaluation. Students complete the course through a demonstration of their empirical writing skills with an APA formatted research proposal.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 100 General Psychology and ENG 110 English Composition I
    3 credits
 

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