Aug 15, 2022  
2018 - 2019 Catalog 
    
2018 - 2019 Catalog Archives - Prior Version

Course Descriptions


 

CIT - Computer Information Technology

  
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    CIT 294 - Ethical Hacking


    The need for security against attackers who compromise networks is growing every day. There is a real need for security professionals who are able to conduct test attacks on their network as a way to discover vulnerabilities before attackers do. The Ethical Hacking course is a hands-on course to help students develop these skills. The course will also help you to build the skills of creativity and critical thinking which will be necessary to think like a “hacker.” The newest tools and techniques used to find any vulnerability and exploit in a network will also be introduced in the course, as well as web filtering, Intrusion Protection Systems, and virtualization. This course will prepare students to get certified as an Ethical Hacker by readying them for the EC-Council Certified Ethical Hacker exam 312-50. Students should have basic computer technology and networking knowledge to be successful in this course.
    Prerequisite(s): CIT 132 Local Area Networks or CIT 194 Networking Basics or at least 2 years’ prior experience in computer networking / technology.
    3 Credits
  
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    CIT 296 - Routing Technologies


    The primary focus of this course is the theory and configuration of Cisco routers. The goal is to develop an understanding of routing protocols such as RIP, EIGRP, and OSPF. The course provides a thorough understanding of static and dynamic routing as well as use of VLSM and CIDR. The commands to configure the router will be learned as well as understanding the operation of the protocols and their effect on the network. This course is the second course in the four course series offered in partnership with the Cisco Networking Academy. Students passing this last course should are on their way to being well prepared to pass the CCNA certification exam, which is a highly regarded certification in the telecommunications industry.
    Prerequisite(s): CIT 194 Networking Basics
    5 credits
  
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    CIT 297 - Switching Technologies


    The primary focus of this course is on LAN switching and wireless LANs. The goal is to develop an understanding of how a switch communicates with other switches and routers in a small or medium-sized business network to implement VLAN segmentation. This course is the third course in the four course series offered in partnership with the Cisco Network Academy.
    Prerequisite(s): CIT 296 Routing Technologies
    5 credits
  
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    CIT 298 - WAN Technologies


    The primary focus of this course is the theory and design of wide area networks (WANs). The goal is to develop an understanding of WAN technology including PPP and Frame Relay. The course also integrates security and troubleshooting of the WAN. This course is the fourth course in the four course series offered in partnership with the Cisco Network Academy. Students passing this last course should be well prepared to pass the CCNA certification exam, which is a highly regarded certification in the telecommunications industry.
    Prerequisite(s): CIT 297 Switching Technologies
    5 credits

CIV - Civilization

  
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    CIV 100 - Western Civilization: Ancient through Renaissance**


    This course examines past cultures in order to compare their experiences and make us aware of the opportunities and limitations of modern cultures. Major political, social, economic, and culture trends and their influences on modern civilization are examined. As an introduction, this course begins in the Ancient Near East and proceeds through the Central Middle Ages. Western Civilization: Renaissance to Present (CIV 110) examines the period from the 17th century to the present.
    Note(s): **This course is part of the 30 credit transfer framework agreement with the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education universities.
    3 credits
  
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    CIV 110 - Western Civilization: Renaissance to Present**


    This course examines the history and experiences of cultures from the Renaissance to the present. Major political, social, economic, cultural and religious trends and influences are examined, discussed and interpreted. Topic discussions include perspectives on the rise of European power, revolutions (political, social, scientific and economic), the arts, literature, philosophy, nationalism and global interdependence among nations.
    Note(s): **This course is part of the 30 credit transfer framework agreement with the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education universities.
    3 credits

COM - Communication

  
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    COM 101 - Public Speaking


    This course is designed to help the student build confidence in the theory and practice of public speaking, with the emphasis on the speaker-audience relationship.  Skills include analyzing the speaking situation, choosing appropriate topics, conducting research, organizing ideas, utilizing evidence, using voice and body to deliver public speeches effectively to a live audience, and developing the ability to listen actively and critically.
    3 credits
  
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    COM 110 - Interpersonal Communication


    This course is a growth-oriented, adaptive communication course that helps students to become more self-confident and self-aware in relationships with friends, co-workers, intimates, and family members. Topics include self-esteem, perception, healthy lifestyle, listening, assertiveness, and conflict management. Required journal entries, exercises, discussions, and readings which focus on feelings and behaviors to promote a healthy psychological adjustment.
    3 credits
  
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    COM 115 - Introduction to Communication


    This introductory course explores human communication in its broadest sense. Emphasis is placed on providing entry-level students with an overview of human communication theory; interpersonal communication; small group, nonverbal, intercultural communication; the basics of effective presentations; and the nature of conflict and strategies for its resolution.
    3 credits
  
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    COM 120 - Organizational Communications


    Communication within an organization is a requirement for success and growth in today’s competitive business environment. Classic and contemporary theoretical approaches to organizational communication are examined, as well as communication issues in the workplace related to cultural, social, and leadership issues. Students study the formal flow of information as well as the grapevine channels of communication. Students review information technologies, such as the Internet, the World Wide Web, and teleconferencing.
    3 credits
  
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    COM 125 - Effective Presentation Skills


    This course helps students develop the skills necessary to make business presentations. Emphasis is placed on using multimedia techniques, software programs, and other materials available today to deliver a message to a variety of audiences, such as coworkers, small groups, clients, or the general public.
    3 credits
  
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    COM 200 - Media and Society


    This course examines the effects of mass media on attitudes and behavior that are observed and experienced. A historical and student experiential perspective for current issues, developed from an examination of the business and profession of mass communication are examined. The functions, interrelationships and responsibilities of print, electronic, cinema and communication, journalism, marketing, public relations, business, management and the general college student or professional who would benefit from a conceptual/analytical examination of mass communication and seek to understand this important part of their culture. Students should leave the course with an understanding of the fundamentals of communication theory; how mass media systems evolved; how organizations, which make up the systems, operate; the effects of mass media on individuals, groups and institutions; and the influence of information technology on media systems and society.
    3 credits
  
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    COM 210 - Group Dynamics


    This course focuses on defining a group, theories of group development, decision making strategies, communication concepts, emotionality within groups, conflict resolution techniques, methods for diagnosing group problems and techniques for improving group efficiency. The course is intended to provide you with the understanding and skill necessary to communicate effectively in any group, whether it is a social club, a religious organization, or a high-level executive committee in your future career. However, it goes more specifically to your preparation for the intensive work in teams that you probably will experience in your personal life and in your workplace. It will give you a foundation of knowledge, experience to develop your skills, and a resource for future use.
    3 credits

CRJ - Criminal Justice

  
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    CRJ 105 - Institutional and Community Corrections


    This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the structure and operations of correctional systems, the evolutionary and political development of institutional corrections, and the goals of community corrections in society’s attempt to control crime to an in-depth look at two of the most pressing problems in U.S. corrections today: overcrowding and financial problems. Additionally, students will examine the processes involved in parole and probation decisions for adult and juvenile offenders. Students will study the fundamental concepts, theory, and nature of community corrections
    with emphasis on the organizations, policies and practices of federal, state and county systems. Theoretical perspectives from both sociology and criminology will be compared and contrasted. Guest speakers from a variety of institutions may be scheduled as part of this course.
    3 credits
  
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    CRJ 110 - Introduction to Criminal Justice


    The focus of this competency is to introduce students to the field of criminal justice through the examination of historical data, statistical information, theories of crime causation, social control of behavior, development of laws, and evaluation of criminal justice system policies, procedures, and trends. Students learn the terminology of the field, and gain an awareness of the methods of inquiry utilized in the field.
    3 credits
  
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    CRJ 115 - Ethics in Criminal Justice


    The focus of this competency is to provide students with an overview of prominent ethical issues facing professionals in criminology and criminal justice, with an emphasis on encouraging individual students to explore their own ethical and moral systems and how they make ethical/moral decisions.
    3 credits
  
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    CRJ 120 - Criminal Justice Report Writing & Interviewing


    This course is focused on the techniques and skill development of interviewing witnesses, victims, and suspects, as well as note taking and report writing in the criminal justice context. Communicating facts, information, and ideas effectively, in a simple, clear and logical manner for various types of criminal justice system documentation including, but not limited to: daily reports, letters, investigative report writing (including interviews), traffic violations, internal department memos, etc., whether in written or electronic (via the computer) format will be stressed. This course will examine the practical aspects of interviewing as well as gathering, organizing and preparing written reports for the various criminal justice components (law enforcement, judicial system and corrections).
    3 credits
  
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    CRJ 135 - Introduction to Cybercrime


    The focus of this course is to introduce students to cyber and digital crime through the examination and description of various types of crimes committed using computer technology, theories addressing hackers and other types of digital criminals, an overview of the legal strategies and tactics targeting this type of crime, and investigation and research into digital crime, digital terrorism, and information warfare.  Additionally, upon successful completion of this course, students will be better prepared for further study of growing problems in crime, terrorism and information warfare being committed using computer technology.
    3 credits
  
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    CRJ 150 - Juvenile Justice


    This course gives students an overview of American juvenile justice, in terms of both system and practice. It examines the juvenile offender, causes of juvenile crime, the juvenile court system, and juveniles in the adult court system. This course also looks at institutionalization, rehabilitation, the treatment of juveniles, and the future of juvenile justice in America. Theoretical perspectives from both sociology and criminology will be compared and contrasted.  Field trips and guest speakers from a variety of institutions may be scheduled as part of this course.
    3 credits
  
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    CRJ 201 - Contemporary Security Management


    This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the structure and operations of the private security industry, the field’s evolutionary and political development and goals of private security in contemporary society.  It introduces the student to the complexities of modern private security and examines related laws and strategies for premises, retail, business, employment, and information/computer security as well as investigation, surveillance and homeland security.  Students will study the latest technological advances in biometrics, surveillance techniques, cyberstalking, electronic monitoring, cybercrime, computer viruses and data security.  Emphasis will be placed on professionalism in the industry and forming collaborative partnerships with law enforcement agencies to solve common problems.  Guest speakers from a variety of private security agencies may be scheduled as part of this course.
    Prerequisite(s): CRJ 110 Introduction to Criminal Justice
    3 credits
  
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    CRJ 215 - Criminal Law and Procedure


     

     

    The focus of this competency is to examine the historical background, the traditions, and the legal principles that underlie the Courts as an integral component of the American system of Criminal Justice. Both differences and similarities inherent within the State and Federal Court processes will be analyzed, and the procedures through which the criminal courts uphold the basic rights and liberties of all U.S. citizens, both victims and the accused, will be explored. A primary focus will be placed upon understanding the respective roles played by Judges, Prosecuting Attorneys, Defense Counsel, Police, and Probation Officers and other Court-related personnel in the criminal court process.
    Prerequisite(s): CRJ 110 - Introduction to Criminal Justice
    3 credits

  
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    CRJ 225 - Criminological Theory


    The focus of this competency is to provide students with an academic focus of criminology through an examination of its theories, basic assumptions and definitions via the interdisciplinary disciplines of sociology, psychology, and biology.  Research methodologies will accentuate the understanding of these theoretical perspectives and their direct practical application.
    Prerequisite(s): CRJ 110 - Introduction to Criminal Justice
    3 credits
  
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    CRJ 235 - Criminal Investigation and Policing


    The focus of this competency is to introduce students to the history, function, and role of law enforcement in American society. The multi-dimensional work of policing is emphasized. Practical and critical approaches to law enforcement are undertaken to explore prevailing and dissenting perspectives in issues in contemporary policing. This course provides an in-depth examination of one of the three cornerstones of traditional policing, criminal investigation. Topics include physical evidence, information sources, interviews and interrogations, eyewitness identifications, crime scene reconstruction, homicide investigations, burglaries, robberies, sex crime investigations, specialized investigations, and managing criminal investigations.
    Prerequisite(s): CRJ 110 Introduction to Criminal Justice
    3 credits
  
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    CRJ 260 - Deviance & Victimology


    This course introduces students to the study of deviance and victimology within criminal justice. This course also examines the theories and research of deviance (including white collar/corporate crime, sex crimes, gangs, abductions, racism, child abuse, etc.) and victimology (the scientific study of victimization, including the relationships between victims and offenders, the interactions between victims and the criminal justice system (law enforcement, victim services, courts, and corrections). Finally, an examination of actual court cases will assist in illustrating social policy as it relates to criminology: research used in criminology; typologies such as violent crime; crimes against individuals; and victim-centered responses.
    Prerequisite(s): CRJ 110 Introduction to Criminal Justice, SOC 100 Introduction to Sociology, and PSY 100 General Psychology
    3 credits
  
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    CRJ 295 - Criminal Justice Internship


    The internship is the field experience for students majoring in Criminal Justice, and utilizes a concurrent model of field education. This model affords students the opportunity to simultaneously practice in the field and uses seminars as a forum to improve their service skills and enhance their team building skills. Students coordinate their internship experience with the faculty internship advisor and the site supervisor at the location of the field experience. The internship is designed to enable the student to experience increasing levels of responsibility within the fieldwork facility. The field experience is a minimum of 150 hours on site, along attendance at regularly scheduled internship seminar meetings. Students may intern at their work site with approval from the faculty internship advisor or may choose an internship position available in the community.
    Note(s): Student is responsible for presenting approved current ACT 34 Child Abuse Clearance and ACT 151 PA Criminal Background Record prior to beginning approved internship.
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of minimum of 45 credits and CRJ 110 Introduction to Criminal Justice
    3 credits

CSC - Computer Science

  
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    CSC 101 - Introduction to Computer Science


    This course provides an introduction to the field of computer science. Topics to be covered include: basics of computer architecture and organization, digital logic and data representation, algorithm analysis and design, programming languages, and software engineering.
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 020 Introduction to Composition, ICR 031 Critical College Reading, and MAT 085 Algebra Fundamentals, or by placement exam.
    3 credits
  
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    CSC 126 - Programming I


    This course introduces the student to the process of creating algorithms for the solution of problems using a computer.  Problem solving structures will first be presented independent of programming language.  Concepts, including variables, assignment statements, conditionals, loops, functions, and arrays are explored.
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 020 Introduction to Composition, ICR 031 Critical College Reading, and MAT 085 Algebra Fundamentals; or by placement exam.
    3 credits
  
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    CSC 206 - Programming II: Object-Oriented Programming


    This course will provide an in-depth exploration of Object-Oriented Programming as well as advanced concepts in programming.  Included are the topics of classes and subclasses, encapsulation, inheritance, polymorphism, event handling, exception handling, and garbage collection.
    Prerequisite(s): CSC 126 Programming I
    3 credits
  
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    CSC 211 - Survey of Programming Languages


    This course is a comparative survey of programming languages and their paradigms that includes examinations of the properties, applications, syntax, and semantics of selected programming languages.  Students will be expected to have a solid programming background such that they can quickly learn various aspects of different programming languages on their own.
    Prerequisite(s): CSC 206 Programming II: Object-Oriented Programming
    3 credits
  
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    CSC 215 - Data Structures


    This course will cover recursion, linked lists, stacks, queues, hashing, graphs, and trees, as well as strategies for choosing the right data structure.  Also presented will be divide-and-conquer strategies, sorting algorithms, and analysis of algorithms.
    Prerequisite(s): CSC 211 Survey of Programming Languages and MAT 204 Discrete Mathematics
    3 credits
  
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    CSC 220 - Computer Organization and Architecture


    This course will explore computer organization and architecture.  Topics covered will include: computer architecture, computer organization, number systems, storage concepts, I/O, memory management, and process management.  Assembly language will be used. 
    Prerequisite(s): CSC 101 Introduction to Computer Science and CSC 211 Survey of Programming Languages
    4 credits

ECD - Early Childhood Management and Leadership

  
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    ECD 284 - Professionalism and Leadership in Early Childhood Programs


    This course is part of the requirements for the PA Director Credential. It is expected that early childhood and school-age professionals demonstrate a commitment to professionalism and leadership that goes beyond the learning environment. This course will introduce professionals to examine, explore, and practice leadership roles in the early childhood and school-age profession. The course is designed for directors of both for-profit and non-profit child care centers who are seeking the Pennsylvania Keys to Professional Development Director Credential. Participants will build upon existing leadership skills and learn new skills from classic to innovating collaborative and team-building approaches to move towards quality improvement to maintain high level quality programming. 
    Prerequisite(s): This course is part of the Pennsylvania Director’s Credential. Students who plan to enroll in the course must have one of the following: 1) associate’s degree in a non-related field including 18 credit hours in Early Childhood Education and 5 years’ experience in a director/supervisory position, 2) associate’s degree in a related field including 18 credit hours in Early Childhood Education and 4 years’ experience in a director/supervisory position, 3) associate’s degree in Early Childhood Education and 3 years’ experience in a director/supervisory position, 4) bachelor’s degree in a non-related field including 18 credit hours in Early Childhood Education and 3 years’ experience in a director/supervisory position, 5) bachelor’s degree in a related field including 18 credit hours in Early Childhood Education and 2 years’ experience in a director/supervisory position, or 6) bachelor’s degree in Early Childhood Education and 1 year experience in a director/supervisory position.
    3 credits
  
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    ECD 285 - Program Organization and Administration of Early Childhood Programs


    This course is part of the requirements for the PA Director Credential. Each program needs a leader that aligns the vision and mission of the program with an organized, professional program. This course will guide leaders to implement quality improvement strategies, acquire data, and best practices to meet the needs of families, children, and staff.
    Prerequisite(s): This course is part of the Pennsylvania Director’s Credential. Students who plan to enroll in the course must have one of the following: 1) associate’s degree in a non-related field including 18 credit hours in Early Childhood Education and 5 years’ experience in a director/supervisory position, 2) associate’s degree in a related field including 18 credit hours in Early Childhood Education and 4 years’ experience in a director/supervisory position, 3) associate’s degree in Early Childhood Education and 3 years’ experience in a director/supervisory position, 4) bachelor’s degree in a non-related field including 18 credit hours in Early Childhood Education and 3 years’ experience in a director/supervisory position, 5) bachelor’s degree in a related field including 18 credit hours in Early Childhood Education and 2 years’ experience in a director/supervisory position, or 6) bachelor’s degree in Early Childhood Education and 1 year experience in a director/supervisory position.
    3 credits
  
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    ECD 286 - Business Management in Early Childhood Programs


    This course is designed for directors of both for-profit and non-profit child care centers who are seeking the Pennsylvania Early Learning Keys to Quality Director’s Credential. This course introduces center-based and family child care professionals to practical business management and explores a variety of topics such as budgeting, financial management, risk management, grant writing, and marketing strategies. Participants build existing business management skills, explore new skills and management applications, and build a network of peers for support. The course is designed to give participants the opportunity for practical application of their learning through assignments, action groups, and budget-oriented action plans.
    Prerequisite(s): This course is part of the Pennsylvania Director’s Credential. Students who plan to enroll in the course must have one of the following: 1) associate’s degree in a non-related field including 18 credit hours in Early Childhood Education and 5 years’ experience in a director/supervisory position, 2) associate’s degree in a related field including 18 credit hours in Early Childhood Education and 4 years’ experience in a director/supervisory position, 3) associate’s degree in Early Childhood Education and 3 years’ experience in a director/supervisory position, 4) bachelor’s degree in a non-related field including 18 credit hours in Early Childhood Education and 3 years’ experience in a director/supervisory position, 5) bachelor’s degree in a related field including 18 credit hours in Early Childhood Education and 2 years’ experience in a director/supervisory position, or 6) bachelor’s degree in Early Childhood Education and 1 year experience in a director/supervisory position.
    3 credits

ECE - Early Childhood Education

  
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    ECE 101 - Introduction to Early Childhood Education


    Principles of Early Childhood Education is an introduction to current state of early childhood education in the United States. This course introduces the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) Standards for Early Childhood Professional Preparation and Pennsylvania State Standards for Education. Students will begin the development of a professional portfolio and Pennsylvania Early Learning Professional Development Record in this class. This course will cover the foundations of curriculum, materials, and instruction of early childhood education.
    Note(s): Students should obtain the following clearances while taking this course: ACT 34, ACT 114 and ACT 151.
    3 credits
  
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    ECE 110 - Child Development


    This course focuses on child development from conception to age nine with an emphasis on the infant/preschool child through middle childhood. The course studies the physical, cognitive, and personality-social aspects of development, both through normal and atypical circumstances. Small group projects, child observations, investigation, and discussion of issues related to scientific principles of development are examined. The National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) standards, the Pennsylvania Early Learning standards (ELS), and the Council for Exceptional Children standards (CEC) are used throughout the course.
    3 credits
  
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    ECE 140 - Early Childhood Environments


    This course explores methods for planning, facilitating, and assessing developmentally appropriate activities and environments designed to enhance typical and atypical children’s cognitive, social, emotional, physical, and creative development in different program models. Students will use developmental knowledge to design and create learning centers, content materials, and other educational elements to structure a welcoming, language-rich environment.
    3 credits
  
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    ECE 198 - Early Childhood Education Practicum I


    Students engaged in early childhood degree programs understand that child observation, documentation, and other forms of assessment are central to the practice of all early childhood professionals. In this course, the students will be able to use systematic observations, documentation and other assessment in the education and development of the young child, birth to pre-kindergarten. Students will observe, participate, reflect and write about their learning in this early childhood setting.
    Note(s): This course requires 20 hours of observation/participation.
    Prerequisite(s): Acts 34, 114 and 151 Clearances, ECE 101 Introduction to Early Childhood Education, ECE 110 Child Development
    1 credit
  
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    ECE 205 - Emerging Literacy/Inclusion


    This course focuses on the development of literacy processes for all children birth through 4th grade, emphasizing typically developing children, but also addressing atypically developing children. Students review current literacy research; explore the implications of research for teaching practices; and examine approaches to planning, implementing, and evaluating engaging literacy experiences that build on the knowledge, skills, and dispositions that children bring to the classroom. 
    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101 Introduction to Early Childhood and ECE 110 Child Development
    3 credits
  
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    ECE 211 - Teaching Science for Early Childhood


    Science is a fundamental aspect of inquiry based learning in early childhood education. This course will allow the learning, teaching and assessing of basic science concepts and applications from Pre-K to 4th grade in early education environments. Students will utilize the Pennsylvania Early Learning and Academic Standards and Assessment Anchors to emphasize cooperative learning, self-assessment, and hands-on science.
    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101 Introduction to Early Childhood and ECE 110 Child Development
    3 credits
  
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    ECE 215 - Teaching: Integrating Curriculum through Creative Expression


    Creative Expression involves all of the elements of developmental and environmental interaction for Pre-K-4th grade children in regular, inclusive, and diverse settings. Students in the course learn how to design and apply developmentally appropriate practice and academic rigor within the curriculum, incorporating Early Learning and Academic Standards, and Assessment Anchors in structured lesson plans.
    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101 Introduction to Early Childhood and ECE 110 Child Development
    3 credits
  
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    ECE 225 - Health, Safety, and Nutrition for the Young Child


    This course provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the nutrition, health, and safety needs of young children from birth into school age.  Furthermore, it prepares teachers to serve diverse populations of young children in family child care, child care centers, preschools, and elementary school settings.  The purpose of this course is to equip students with a strong understanding of wellness concepts, preparing them to implement healthful practices and teach young children ways to contribute to their own wellness.
    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101 Introduction to Early Childhood and ECE 110 Child Development
    3 credits
  
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    ECE 250 - Children, Families, and Community


    This course explores parent/guardian involvement and the relationship between homes, schools, and communities. Content is organized around how the home, family, school, and community all influence the growth, development, and education of younger children. Students will learn how schools relate to parents and will acquire knowledge and skills to implement quality parent involvement programs. The course goal is to demonstrate the qualities of effective partnerships between schools, homes, and agencies. 
    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101 Introduction to Early Childhood and ECE 110 Child Development
    3 credits
  
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    ECE 290 - Assessing Child Performance/Inclusion


    This course is a comprehensive review of assessment theory, practice, and tools used to effectively assess a child’s level of achievement and prepare educational strategies to engage the child at the next level of competence. Assessment is viewed as an ongoing developmentally effective process rather than an ending to an educational experience. This course provides the most current research and practical guides to integrate authentic assessment with effective teaching, including the study of PA mandated assessments for Pre-K through Kindergarten. An introduction to assessments used in 1st-4th grade is presented. The course will use material and pre-service experience to interpret and use assessment information once it has been collected.  The course is developed around the constructivist approach, recognizing and adapting assessment techniques to accommodate cultural and individual differences. Students learn how to adapt the learning environment for special needs students.  This course requires twenty (20) hours of observation/participation.
    Prerequisite(s): Acts 34, 114 and 151 Clearances, ECE 101 Introduction to Early Childhood, ECE 110 Child Development and ECE 198 Early Childhood Education Practicum I
    Co-requisite(s): ECE 295 Capstone Seminar in Early Childhood Education
    3 credits
  
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    ECE 295 - Capstone Seminar in Early Childhood Education


    This course is the culminating seminar devoted to analyzing and synthesizing knowledge and skills gained through the student’s prior coursework in early childhood education. The seminar’s requirements include: writing a teaching philosophy, preparation of a final research and reflective paper that incorporates teaching, research, and learning practice and final presentation of the graduation portfolio.
    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101 Introduction to Early Childhood and ECE 110 Child Development
    Co-requisite(s): ECE 290 Assessing Child Performance/Inclusion
    1 credit

ECO - Economics

  
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    ECO 100 - Macroeconomics


    The course is designed to introduce the student to the basic principles of economics with an emphasis on macroeconomic analysis, policy and theory. The major topics for the course include the scope and nature of economics, ideology and structure of the American economy, supply and demand, production and opportunity cost, efficiency, gross domestic product, business cycles and unemployment, inflation, history of economic thought, federal deficits and national debt, and monetary policy.
    3 credits
  
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    ECO 110 - Microeconomics


    This course is designed to introduce students to basic principles of microeconomics theory and analysis. The major topics of the course include the scope and nature of economics, price elasticity of demand and supply, consumer choice theory, production costs, market structures, labor markets, income distribution, poverty and discrimination, antitrust regulation, environmental economics, international trade and finance, comparative economic systems, and growth in less developed countries.
    3 credits

EDU - Education

  
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    EDU 120 - Technology for Teaching


    This course is designed to prepare future and current teachers to select, use, modify, design, and integrate instructional and assistive technologies in the classroom. Experience in learning and using instructional technology such as email, PowerPoint, internet, database, spreadsheets, scanner, and various software packages will be addressed during the course of the class.  These technology enhancements serve as an integral part of lesson development based on the national Education Technology Standards (NETS).
    Prerequisite(s): CIT 100 Microcomputer Applications
    3 credits
  
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    EDU 225 - Teaching English Language Learners


    Under the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) as well as Pennsylvania law, all teachers in all areas of certification in public and charter schools are required to have specific knowledge for teaching English Language Learners (ELLs) and understanding ELL programs, enabling teachers to provide accommodations and adaptations to all educational programs for ELLs in Kindergarten through grade 12. This course will demonstrate the application of classroom tools, techniques and methods for teaching linguistically and culturally diverse students at all levels of English language proficiency in the content areas of education.
    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101 Introduction to Early Childhood and ECE 110 Child Development
    3 credits
  
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    EDU 230 - Children with Special Needs


    Educators in grades Pre-K-12 are required to provide services for any student who is assessed and determined by the special education committee to have one or more of the thirteen classifications of a disability or who is categorized as gifted or talented. Any teacher who has a student with an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) must not only read and sign the IEP, but must provide for support of the goals and objectives of the IEP in the classroom. This course will include learning to accommodate special education students in the classroom, as well as best practices for teaching students with different types of disabilities.
    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101 Introduction to Early Childhood and ECE 110 Child Development
    3 credits
  
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    EDU 240 - Field Experience in Education


    Students receive direct experience with teaching through supervised field placement in an elementary or secondary school setting. Lectures and classroom teaching experiences are combined to allow students the opportunity of applying skills in observation, interaction, and professional behavior.
    Prerequisite(s): Acts 34, 114 and 151 Clearances, EDU 120 Technology for Teaching, and Learning and 45 earned credits
    3 credits
  
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    EDU 297 - PAPA Test Preparation


    PAPA Test Preparation is a one credit hour course designed to give students planning on transferring to a four-year institution in teacher education an orientation to the testing program, as well as an opportunity to apply knowledge and skills which prepare them to take and pass the examination.
    1 credit

ELT - Electronics

  
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    ELT 105 - AC/DC High Voltage


    This course investigates AC and DC electrical theory and applications as applied to high voltage transmission and distribution, and as used in the field of electrical power transmission for commercial, residential and industrial systems. 
    4 credits
  
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    ELT 220 - Material, Safety, and Equipment Overview for Nanofabrication


    This course provides an overview of the materials, safety and equipment issues encountered in the practice of “top down” and “bottom up” nanofabrication. It focuses on safety, environmental and health issues in equipment operation and materials handling as well as on clean-room protocol. Topics to be covered include: clean-room operation, OSHA lab standard safety training, health issues, Biosafety Levels (BSL) guidelines, and environmental concerns. Safety issues dealing with nanofabrication equipment, materials, and processing will also be discussed including those pertinent to biological materials, wet benches, thermal processing tools, plasma based equipment, stamping and embossing lithography tools, vacuum systems and pumps, gas delivery systems and toxic substance handling and detection. Specific material handling procedures to be discussed will include corrosive, flammable, and toxic materials, biological materials, carcinogenic materials, DI water, solvents, cleaners, photo resists, developers, metals, acids, and bases. The course will also concentrate on safe equipment maintenance and operation. Students will be given an overview of basic nanofabrication materials, equipment and equipment operation. This technical overview and operational introduction to processing equipment and characterization tools will include: chemical processing, furnaces, vacuum based processing (physical vapor deposition equipment, chemical vapor deposition equipment, and dry etching equipment), and lithography as well as scanning probe microscopy (e.g., atomic force microscopy), optical microscope, electron microscopy (e.g., scanning electron microscopy), ellipsometer, nanospec, and profilometer equipment.
    Note(s): Course offered on the Penn State University Campus in partnership with the Penn State University Nanotechnology Program.
    3 credits
  
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    ELT 221 - Basic Nanofabrication Processes


    This course is the hands-on introduction to the processing involved in “top down”, “bottom up”, and hybrid nanofabrication. The majority of the course details a step-by-step description of the equipment, facilities processes and process flow needed to fabricate devices and structures. Students learn to appreciate processing and manufacturing concerns including process control, contamination, yield, and processing interaction. The students design process flows for micro- and nano-scale systems. Students learn the similarities and differences in “top down” and “bottom up” equipment and process flows by undertaking hands-on processing. This hands-on exposure covers basic nanofabrication processes including colloidal chemistry, self-assembly, catalyzed nanoparticle growth, lithography, wet and dry etching, physical vapor deposition, and chemical vapor deposition.
    Note(s): Course offered on the Penn State University Campus in partnership with the Penn State University Nanotechnology Program.
    3 credits
  
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    ELT 222 - Materials in Nanotechnology


    This course is an in-depth, hands-on exposure to materials fabrication approaches used in nanofabrication. Students learn that these processes can be guided by chemical or physical means or by some combination of these. Hands-on exposure will include self-assembly; colloidal chemistry; atmosphere, low-pressure and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition; sputtering; thermal and electron beam evaporation; nebulization and spin-on techniques. This course is designed to give students hands-on experience in depositing, fabricating and self-assembling a wide variety of materials tailored for their mechanical, electrical, optical, magnetic, and biological properties.
    Note(s): Course offered on the Penn State University Campus in partnership with the Penn State University Nanotechnology Program.
    3 credits
  
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    ELT 223 - Lithography for Nanofabrication


    This course is a hands-on treatment of all aspects of advanced pattern transfer and pattern transfer equipment including probe techniques; stamping and embossing; e-beam; and optical contact and stepper systems. The course is divided into five major sections. The first section is an overview of all pattern generation processes covering aspects from substrate preparation to tool operation. The second section concentrates on photolithography and examines such topics as mask template, and mold generation. Chemical makeup of resists will be discussed including polymers, solvents, sensitizers, and additives. The role or dyes and antireflective coatings will be discussed. In addition, critical dimension (CD) control and profile control of resists will be investigated. The third section will discuss the particle beam lithographic techniques such as e-beam lithography. The fourth section covers probe pattern generation and the fifth section explores embossing lithography, step-and-flash, stamp lithography, and self-assembled lithography.
    Note(s): Course offered on the Penn State University Campus in partnership with the Penn State University Nanotechnology Program.
    3 credits
  
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    ELT 224 - Materials Modification in Nanofabrication


    This course will cover in detail the processing techniques and specialty hardware used in modifying properties in nanofabrication. Material modification steps to be covered will include etching, functionalization, alloying, stress control and doping. Avoiding unintentional materials modification will also be covered including such topics as use of diffusion barriers, encapsulation, electromigration control, corrosion control, wettability, stress control, and adhesion. Hands-on materials modification and subsequent characterization will be undertaken.
    Note(s): Course offered on the Penn State University Campus in partnership with the Penn State University Nanotechnology Program.
    3 credits
  
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    ELT 225 - Characterization, Testing of Nanofabricated Structures and Materials


    This course examines a variety of techniques and measurements essential for testing and for controlling material fabrication and final device performance. Characterization includes electrical, optical, physical, and chemical approaches. The characterization experience will include hands-on use of tools such as the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), fluorescence microscopes, and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.
    Note(s): Course offered on the Penn State University Campus in partnership with the Penn State University Nanotechnology Program.
    3 credits

ENG - English

  
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    ENG 010 - Basic English


    ENG 010 is an intensive review of English grammar, punctuation, and fundamental sentence skills. Successful completion of the course will allow the student to enroll in Introduction to Composition (ENG 020). This college-preparatory course does not count toward graduation or toward GPA calculations, and it is not generally transferable to other institutions.
    3 institutional credits
  
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    ENG 020 - Introduction to Composition


    Designed to prepare students for ENG 110, ENG 020 emphasizes fundamental composition skills, in addition to reviewing grammar and punctuation. Through frequent writing assignments, sentence drills, readings, and class discussion, students develop basic skills in paragraph and essay writing. As a college preparatory course, ENG 020 does not count toward graduation, does not earn college credit, and does not count in GPA calculations.
    Prerequisite(s): ENG010 or by placement exemption or examination
    3 institutional credits
  
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    ENG 105 - Effective Writing for the Workplace


    Effective Writing for the Workplace emphasizes the techniques of writing the types of documents regularly encountered in a variety of work environments stressing careful thinking, word choice, sentence structure, and methods of organization. Students practice the writing of clear, coherent, and unified documents, including but not limited to emails, business letters, and reports. The use of correct grammar and mechanics is highly emphasized with a considerable amount of the course dedicated to learning and understanding standard punctuation and grammar. There is no research requirement for this course; this course is not intended for transfer to other colleges or universities.
    Prerequisite(s): Placement Testing
    3 credits
  
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    ENG 110 - English Composition I**


    This course emphasizes the techniques of writing expository essays with stress upon careful thinking, word choice, sentence structure, and methods of organization. Students practice the writing of clear, coherent, and unified paragraphs and essays. Editing skills and the use of correct grammar and mechanics are also emphasized. Students are taught research skills and are required to write an argumentative research paper. This is the standard college English composition course.
    Note(s): **This course is part of the 30 credit transfer framework agreement with the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education universities.
    Prerequisite(s): By placement exemption or examination
    3 credits
  
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    ENG 200 - English Composition II: Studies in Literature**


    ENG 200 English Composition II: Studies in Literature emphasizes the study of literary terms and techniques frequently used in literature.  This course introduces students to major themes found in fiction, poetry, and drama.  Students are required to read various types of literature and must be able to respond to their readings in well-developed essays and in an analytical research paper, as well as to participate in class discussions.  This is a standard college-level introductory literature course. 
    Note(s): **This course is part of the 30 credit transfer framework agreement with the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education universities.
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 110 English Composition I
    3 credits
  
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    ENG 205 - Research Writing


    This course emphasizes the skills involved in doing research in various fields and writing about the results. The basic skills of summary, paraphrase, and quotation and the writing of accurate and balanced summaries of articles are taught. Critical thinking and the writing of critiques are emphasized, as is the ability to create a well-thought-out synthesis of multiple sources. Information-gathering skills are also stressed. Finally, the student will research and write a lengthy research project.
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 110 English Composition I
    3 credits
  
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    ENG 215 - Creative Writing


    ENG 215 Creative Writing reviews various writing styles and methods. Students study these methods by analyzing published works and student examples. Students are expected to produce original, insightful works using accurate grammar, punctuation, spelling, and style conventions. Proofreading, revising, and peer editing skills are taught. This is a standard college creative writing course.
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 110 English Composition I
    3 credits
  
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    ENG 220 - Business Letter and Report Writing


    The strategies and techniques of writing letters, memos, and reports are emphasized for situations that arise in business. Business communication skills are developed and refined through assignments that include the writing of positive letters, negative letters, and other business messages. For greater development of these skills, a business report and an oral report are assigned to apply principles for writing analytical or informational reports. This is a required course for some majors.
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 110 English Composition I
    3 credits
  
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    ENG 225 - Technical Writing


    This course stresses the application of skills central to all types of communication that technical personnel are called upon to write. The course involves training in the writing of definitions, descriptions, instructions, proposals, reports, and other technical documents. For greater development of these skills, a formal report is assigned to apply principles for writing reports that are unique to technical professions.
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 110 English Composition I
    3 credits
  
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    ENG 230 - Survey of American Literature I


    This course surveys American literature from the pre-colonial period to the Civil War. The roots of the American experience and the major currents in American thought are discussed. Significant works of American writers, traditional and non-traditional, are studied for their literary value and in their historical and philosophical contexts.
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 110 English Composition I
    3 credits
  
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    ENG 235 - Survey of American Literature II


    This course surveys American literature from the Civil War to the present. Significant works of American writers, traditional and non-traditional, are studied for their literary value and in their historical and philosophical contexts.
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 110 English Composition I
    3 credits
  
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    ENG 240 - Survey of British Literature I


    This course begins with the roots of the English language and of English literature, including the epic Beowulf and the works of Chaucer and other Middle English authors. Shakespeare and other authors of the Early Modern era are studied, in addition to significant authors through the eighteenth century. The student will learn to enjoy and appreciate the literary and cultural heritage of the English language in its historical and philosophical contexts.
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 110 English Composition I
    3 credits
  
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    ENG 245 - Survey of British Literature II


    This course surveys British literature from the Romantic period to the present. The course begins with the origins of the Romantic Movement in the late eighteenth century. The impact of the Industrial Revolution and the social and cultural developments of the nineteenth century provide the context of the Victorian era. The rapid cultural and philosophical changes of the twentieth century and their impact on British writers are also discussed. The student’s enjoyment of significant and influential works of British writers, traditional and nontraditional, is enhanced by understanding the cultural, historical, and philosophical context of these works.
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 110 English Composition I
    3 credits
  
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    ENG 250 - Women and Literature


    This course is designed to introduce students to writing by women in various genres including poetry, fiction, drama, and autobiography. Students will also consider how social class, race, ethnicity, historical time period, and other factors influence women writers.
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 110 English Composition I
    3 credits
  
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    ENG 255 - Literature for Children and Adolescents


    This course explores the various forms and genres of literature for children and adolescents. Topics include the history of literature for children, literary and artistic quality, contemporary issues (including multiculturalism and censorship), and techniques for using children’s literature in the early childhood, elementary, and middle-grade classroom. Students will be encouraged to read widely and to explore a variety of works.
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 110 - English Composition I
    3 credits
  
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    ENG 260 - Monsters in Literature


    This course will introduce the student to an array of monsters found in classic literature. This course will also explore what makes a monster a monster, how they change or stay the same in different historical periods and genres, and how monsters provide insight into the fears and challenges of humankind.
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 110 - English Composition I
    3 credits
  
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    ENG 271 - World Literature


    This course introduces students to Western and non-Western masterworks in translation, across multiple cultures and eras, focusing on works of seminal cultural significance. Works will be read in their literary, historical, philosophical, and cultural context to give a sense of the variety and diversity of the human experience as revealed in literature.
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 110 English Composition I
    3 credits

ENV - Environmental Science

  
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    ENV 110 - Introductory Environmental Science


    This introductory course in environmental science takes students through the fundamental environmental health topics, such as: energy;  risk assessment and management; environmental policy; air quality management; vector control; occupational safety and health; water treatment; and solid and hazardous waste disposal. It will introduce students to the profession by providing a solid working knowledge of the fundamental environmental science topics, and will serve those students who plan to pursue advanced environmental degrees including environmental science, environmental engineering or occupational health and safety, as well as those that wish to advance their career in the field of environmental health and safety.
    3 credits

EUT - Electric Utility Technology

  
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    EUT 100 - Electric Utility Technology Substation I


    This course is the first in a four-part series which provides the student with the basic knowledge of skills necessary to assist with the performance of maintenance and testing in substations and switchyards. 
    6 credits
  
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    EUT 110 - Electric Utility Technology Substation II


    This course is the second in a four-part series providing the student with a broader skill set as well as an enhanced knowledge and skill level necessary to safely assist in the performance of routine repairs on distribution and power transformers, bushings, circuit breakers, disconnect switches, control equipment and other de-energized electrical equipment used in the distribution of electrical energy.  EUT100 Electric Utility Technology Substation I and EUT110 Electric Utility Technology Substation II are prerequisites for the Summer Field Experience.
    Prerequisite(s): EUT 100 Electric Utility Technology Substation I
    6 credits
  
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    EUT 200 - Electric Utility Technology Substation III


    This course is the third in a four-part series providing the student with the advanced knowledge and skills necessary to safely work in a supervised capacity on energized equipment and in an unsupervised capacity on de-energized equipment employed in the production and distribution of electrical energy. This course also introduces the student to power transformer testing, troubleshooting, alarm systems, circuit breaker troubleshooting, reclosers and sectionalizers, OCB maintenance and voltage regulators.
    Prerequisite(s): EUT 110 Electric Utility Technology Substation II
    6 credits
  
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    EUT 210 - Electric Utility Technology Substation IV


    This course is the fourth in a four part series providing the student with the knowledge and skills to work safely and competently in a supervised or unsupervised capacity. This course is the culmination of prior courses with the introduction of advanced knowledge and skills related to MOABS, electronic recloser controls, SF6 gas breakers, ACB maintenance, OCB timing and travel tests, calibration of various substation equipment, PT testing, phasing, switching procedures and the performance of energized primary work.
    Prerequisite(s): EUT 200 Electric Utility Technology Substation III
    6 credits

FLM - Film

  
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    FLM 110 - Introduction to American Cinema


    The course is a thematic and historical study of American cinema. It introduces the history, technology, vocabulary, fundamentals, symbolism and realism of American filmmaking. In addition, specific genres of American films will be viewed and discussed.
    3 credits

FRE - French

  
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    FRE 101 - French I


    This course studies the foundations of French, including pronunciation, basic vocabulary, writing, and target language culture.
    3 credits
  
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    FRE 102 - French II


    This course continues building foundations of French, including pronunciation, basic vocabulary, writing and target language culture.
    Prerequisite(s): FRE 101 French I
    3 credits

FYE - First Year Experience

  
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    FYE 100 - First Year Experience


    The First Year Experience is designed to help first-year students adjust to the college, develop a better understanding of the learning process, and acquire essential academic success skills. The course provides a general orientation to the functions and resources of Pennsylvania Highlands and also provides a support group for students transitioning to college by examining problems common to the first-year experience. Attaining an appropriate balance between personal freedom and social responsibility underlies all activities.
    1 credit

GEO - Geography

  
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    GEO 100 - Introduction to Geography


    This course offers an introduction to the basic concepts found in physical and cultural geography. Characteristics (air, water, land, language, religion, economics, population, urbanization, and national identity) of various world regions will be examined.  A comparison of the characteristics and relationships of world regions will be analyzed. 
    3 credits
  
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    GEO 110 - World Regional Geography


    This course offers the exploration of the world through the regional approach. Students will examine the physical, cultural and locational aspects of the realms that make up the world in geographic study. Each realm will be studied in detail and thoroughly explored as students survey the landmass, culture, religion, economics, political organization, and climate, along with other topics of that part of the world.
    3 credits

GER - German

  
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    GER 101 - Elementary German I


    This course studies the foundations of German, including pronunciation, basic vocabulary, writing and target language culture.
    3 credits
  
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    GER 102 - Elementary German II


    This course continues building foundations of German, including pronunciation, basic vocabulary, writing and target language culture.
    Prerequisite(s): GER 101 Elementary German I
    3 credits

GLG - Geology

  
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    GLG 102 - Introduction to Geology


    Introduction to Geology will explore the fundamental concepts of physical geology and related subjects, including: plate tectonics, earth materials, igneous processes, igneous processes and volcanism, sedimentation, deformation and metamorphism, geologic time, Earth’s history, climate and glaciations, the hydrologic cycle, shaping the Earth’s surface, seismic events and Earth structure.
    Co-requisite(s): GLG 103 Introduction to Geology Lab (if applicable to student major)
    3 credits
  
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    GLG 103 - Introduction to Geology Lab


    This course illustrates many of the topics introduced in lecture through hands-on laboratory experiments.  Experiments in laboratory include, but are not limited to: modeling Earth’s spheres, rock classification, topographic map construction, and simulating earthquake hazards.
    Note(s): Class may be held outside, weather permitting, and possibly off-site depending upon time and transportation constraints.
    Prerequisite(s): GLG 102 Introduction to Geology Lecture
    1 credit

GOV - Government

  
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    GOV 100 - Introduction to American National Government**


    This course introduces the processes and institutions of the American national government. The course examines the evolution of the principles, form, and operation of the national government system with special emphasis on constitutional issues; voting behavior; public opinion; the party system; the Executive, Legislative, and Judicial branches of American national government.
    Note(s): **This course is part of the 30 credit transfer framework agreement with the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education universities.
    3 credits
  
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    GOV 210 - Current Events and Contemporary Issues


    This course will focus on events and issues that face the state, country and world today. Particular attention will be placed on newsworthy events and issues on a weekly basis involving both foreign and domestic policy. They will be put in historical perspective so that students can understand the background that led up to the present action or interpretation. In addition, the ramifications, repercussions and impact of those events and issues will be discussed in a “what if” format.
    3 credits

HIS - History

  
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    HIS 100 - U.S. History I: Discovery through Reconstruction**


    This course focuses on the history of the United States from pre-European discovery, through settlement and growth, the American Revolution, the Young Republic, antebellum America, the Civil War and Reconstruction. Major events will be introduced and analyzed along with political, economic, social and cultural challenges that faced America. In addition, the roles of Native Americans, African slaves and their descendants and women will be explored in sections of the course. 
    Note(s): **This course is part of the 30 credit transfer framework agreement with the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education universities.
    3 credits
  
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    HIS 110 - U.S. History II: Reconstruction to Present**


    This course focuses on the history of the United States from the Gilded Age, Western Expansion, the World Wars and the Great Depression, and the Cold War through America’s leadership role to our status as the sole superpower today. Major events will be introduced and analyzed along with political, economic, social and cultural challenges that faced America. In addition, the roles of the Native Americans, African-Americans, immigrant cultures and women will be explored in sections of the course.
    Note(s): **This course is part of the 30 credit transfer framework agreement with the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education universities.
    3 credits
  
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    HIS 200 - American Immigration


    The course examines the dynamics of immigration to the United States from the 19th to mid-20th centuries. An overview of American immigration will be presented, with a specific focus on immigrants from Northern and Western Europe; those coming from Southern and Eastern Europe; and peoples from Asia and Latin America.
    3 credits
  
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    HIS 205 - American Popular Culture


    This course is an exploration of the 20th into the 21st centuries through the use of American popular culture. Each decade will be examined for the items that helped shape its respective cultural identity. These include film and theater, food and drink, music, print media, sports and games, fashion and fads, television, and radio. By doing so, this class will teach us who we are; what we were; and where we are going.
    3 credits
  
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    HIS 210 - The Civil War and Reconstruction


    This course will examine the time frame in American history from 1850 to 1877-shortly before, during and after the Civil War. Specific focus will be placed on the major battles, causes, politics, and cultural, intellectual, and social aspects of this period.
    3 credits
  
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    HIS 220 - The Vietnam War


    This course focuses on the United States’ war in Vietnam. This includes but not limited to a brief history of Vietnam; how, why and when the United States entered the war; the social, cultural, and political impact the conflict had and still has on the United States; and the specific battles and major events of the war itself.
    3 credits
  
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    HIS 250 - World War II through Film


    This course focuses on the period of World War II, from its origins in European nationalism, World War I and the Great Depression, through its conclusion and aftermath, including the rebuilding of Europe and the Cold War. Particular emphasis is paid to the treatment of the war in the popular cinema.
    3 credits
 

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